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August 14, 1992 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-08-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

BUSINESS

BOWLERS....

PISGAH MEN'S B'NAI 1311Tli
BOWLING LEAGUE LOOKING FOR
NEW BOWLERS/FULL TEAMS WELCOME

THURSDAY NIGHTS 9:30
W. BLOOMFIELD LANES
STARTING SEASON SEPT. 3RD

CALL NOW FOR SPECIAL
OFFERING TO ALL NEW BOWLERS
1/2 OFF SAVINGS ON DUES!

MITCH
MARV

851-0553
476-0666

GREENSTONE'S INVITES

You To A SPECIAL

INVENTORY CLEARANCE.

Greenstone's welcomes you
to an inventory clearance event,
offering substantial savings on selected
fine jewelry, close-out items and
nationally advertised watches.
As always, we look forward to
your visit, or please call at
313-642-2650.

GREENSTONEIS

CREATORS OF FINE JEWELRY SINCE

1925.

528 North Woodward • Birmingham, Ml • 4 Blocks north of Maple • 642-2650

• Bloom 0116 Bloom •

• Registered Electrologists •

Come and let us remove your unwanted hair problem and improve your appearance.

Near 12 Mile Rd. bet. Evergreen &Southfield

559-1969

Appt. Only.

Ask For Shirlee or Debby

David Biber
gze "Cad,/,/ao Afan,"
Crestview Cadillac
656.9500 toll free 541.4133
555 Rochester Rd. (1 Mile N. of Avon) Rochester

Unbeatable Price and
Service Combination!

60

FRIDAY. AUGUST 14 1992



do

Former Detroiter Turns
A Tragedy Into Triumph

JENNIFER FINER

Jewish News Intern

F

ormer Detroiter Louis
August was off to a
great start in the busi-
ness world. At 23, he was
working as a computer ,pro-
gramer for IBM in TE-4- ---?aa
and making good money.';,- -;',
Then came the turni.,:.0-
point in Mr. August's life.
His sister Eve was shot and
killed in a Detroit law office
in a highly publicized inci-
dent.
Devastated by her death,
Mr. August came back to
Michigan to be with his
family and to put his life
back together.
Now, 10 years later, he is
chief executive officer of
Trinity Technology, a suc-
cessful Seattle-based corn-
pany which manufactures
and sells computers and nets
about $10 million a year.
Mr. August's company
consists of a manufacturing
plant and three retail stores.
He also has done govern-
ment contracting.
In a 1991 Washington
survey, Trinity Technology
was listed as the No. 1 corn-
pany to watch in the state of
Washington based on earn-
ings and gross potentials of
thousands of private busi-
nesses located in the state.
Mr. August says his goals
for Trinity are to "build an
excellent company that will
serve as a cash machine and
a place where employees can
realize their true poten-
tials."
One of his goals is also per-
sonal.
As a tribute to his sister
and the values he learned
while growing up in Detroit,
Mr. August is building a
camp in Washington to help
underprivileged teens.
Each week, three teens
will be taught computer
skills and decision-making
techniques he hopes will
help them.
"We plan to take these
kids into an environment
that is conducive to making
the right choices," he said.
"While they are in the
wilderness, the choices they
make will have an immedi-
ate effect. For example,
when they make the right
decision, they will be able to
eat or get warm depending
on the situation."
The camp is scheduled to
open in September.
Before his sister was
killed, Mr. August's plans

Louis August

were clear cut. He attended
the University of Michigan
on a Regents Alumni Schol-
arship and had just landed a
job with IBM as a network
programer when a gunman
open fired at the Buhl
building in downtown
Detroit, killing his sister.
' "After she died, I lost a lot
of my motivation," Mr.
August said. "I had to
redefine my life."
He brushed aside his
credentials to test his skills
at sales and working with
people. At 24, he went to
work as a salesman for a
Computer Land store.
"A job like this did not
take a college education or

"In 1981 there
were really no jobs.
We were the lost
generation out of
Southfield."

Louis August

any of the background I had.
I felt my education was dis-
qualifying me from what I
really wanted to do," Mr.
August said.
Against the advice of his
father, Mr. August went
ahead with his plans.
"I worked so much, people
would talk about how I used
to bring my sleeping bag to
work and spend the night at
the store. But I found some-
thing I loved and I was
escaping from the pain. That
was something I really
needed," he said.
Mr. August soon decided
that Los Angeles was not the
place to raise a family and
although he had just left
Computer Land to art a
computer manuf:- . -"ring



firm, he sold it and moved to
Seattle.
He came back to town for
his Southfield High School
10-year reunion, and was not
surprised to see how many
people had left the Detroit
area.
"In 1981 there were really
no jobs. We were the lost ge-
neration out of Southfield.
There was a real escapist at-
titude and people went
elsewhere," he said.
"When I was in Tampa, I
remember seeing articles
about the black tag people
from Michigan. We were
called that because at that
time there were so many
people in Florida with the
black Michigan plates."
So what's ahead for this
businessman who already
knows how to surf?
Politics.
"Once I am ready, and
once I've developed the cash
machine and the camp is
stable, I want to go into poli-
tics because I know I can get
people to believe in them-
selves," Mr. August said. 0

••■■1 IN BRIEF Immimn

PATRICIA A. MILNER,

Teitel Federation Apartment
administrator, participated in
the eighth annual Sherman
Seminar for Outstanding
Young Professionals held at
Brandeis University.
A native Clevelander, Ms.
Milner has been with JFA
since March 1987. Her
responsibilities include coor-
dinating the construction and
rent-up of the Harriett and
Ben Teitel Federation Apart-
ments in Oak Park and
developing the JFA newslet-
ter, Benaynu.

FRED HOOPER has been
promoted to senior vice presi-
dent, director of creative ser-
vices for Stone, August, Baker
Communications Companies.

SHERRIE WEITZMAN has
joined Lionel Trains, Inc. as
director. -0o marketing ser-
vices. Weitzman will be
respons* for media adver-
tising,
is relations, sales
promo
and merchandis-
ing fo
complete line of
Lionel
-f4acts.

EDWA

GOLD,

senior

a

d family law
-
law
aw firm of
Butzel
een elected
president oi
le nearly
3,500-member Oakland
County Bar Association.

:





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