100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 31, 1992 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPINION

Off The Record

Continued from preceding page

Is your small business or practice
lost in the big bank shuffle?

Maybe it's time to shuffle over to Franklin Bank. We're in step
with small companies. And, we're ready to give you the kind of
service and attention that only the biggest companies can
demand from the bigger banks.

Our Commercial Checking account has all the features you
need, including the lowest fees in Metropolitan Detroit.
Compare for yourself. . .

Commercial
Checking Accounts

Franklin Bank
NBD
Manufacturers
Mich. National
Cornerica

Per
Deposit
Item

Per
Deposit
Slip

Per
Account
Statement

Per
Check
Drawn

Per
ATM
Deposit

-0-

-0-
$1.10
$1.00
$0.90
$0.95

$10.00
$16.00
$15.00
$14.00
$15.00

-0-

-0-
$1.00
$0.90
$1.00
$0.95

.10t

.104
.104

.1 OC

.231

.244
.234
.234

*As of March 1, 1992

Franklin
Bank

N.A.

358-5170

FDIC INSURED

Southfield • Birmingham • Grosse Pointe Woods

L

Advertised fee schedule based upon low volume transaction accounts. For accounts generating
in excess of 500 deposit items and/or 500 checks monthly, nominal fees may apply.
Please call for details.

M•1111•11111111.

Right In Your Own Driveway!

NIBBLES
&
NUTS
We Create Impressions

That Last

GIFT BASKETS & TRAYS FOR ALL
OCCASIONS OUR SPECIALTY

737-8088

33020 NORTHWESTERN

L

The Tune Up Man

o f

DOING BUSINESS SINCE 1976

CALL 398-3605

CERTIFIED & LICENSED

VISA & MC WELCOME

The Bright Idea:

Outside Of Michigan

1400.752.1133

Special Candy & Sugarfree Available

8

AUTO REPAIR AT YOUR LOCATION WITH THE GARAGE ON WHEELS

FRIDAY .II _ II Y 31 19C12

Local & Nationwide Delivery

Give a Gift Subscription

THE JEWISH NEWS

he wanted to make a corn,'
ment off the record, he had
to indicate that preference
prior to his remark, not
afterward.
"Since you didn't do that,"
the reporter advised the El
senator, "I fully intend tor:,)
use that quote."
The senator, a normally,,
soft-spoken and composed
man, blew up. He shouted
that in all of his years in
public office, this had never --
happened to him and that c
this journalistic behavior
was an outrage. Then,
turned directly to me and
asked, his voice rising, "Are
you planning to use that
quote, too?"
I'll never forget the sink-
ing feeling because I knew':
that, no matter what I said, I
was dead meat.
If I agreed not to use the
quote because, whether or I
not the senator said the
right words at the right '
time, his intentions were°
clear, and if he saw the quote
appear he would feel '21
betrayed, then my more ex- J
perienced colleague would
conclude that I'd wimped
out, caved in to pressure
from an angry U.S. senator,
and become a blot on our
profession.
But if I agreed with the
Sun reporter, the senatoir—'1
would probably have a
stroke on the spot or, worse,
throttle me right there in
front of the rabbi and my
professional colleagues.
As I mumbled something
about needing to first reflect
on the context of the situa-
tion, I realized that while <
the Sun reporter was cor-
rect, technically, he was
wrong, ultimately.
Because any relationship
between a reporter and his
subject is based on trust,
once that trust — however
vague or ill-defined — is
broken, the journalist has
lost.
rJ
There are no easy answers fl
So much depends on the
cumstances. But in general,
you rely on your instincts —
and you can usually tell
when you are stepping over if,
the line, from helping the !
reader to betraying the'
interviewee.
People being interviewed
need to understand that
when journalists dig for in-
formation, they are only do-
ing their jobs. But jour-
nalists have a responsibility,c
when interviewing people, to
spell out the ground rules up ID'
front, so there are no sur-
prises later. After all, the
only thing we have going for
us is credibility, and once we
lose that, we're finished.
And that, dear reader, is
on the record. [i]

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan