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July 24, 1992 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a■ ‘ft

6

Celebrating 50 years of growth with the Detroit Jewish Community

THE JEWISH NEWS

23 TAMMUZ 5752/JULY 24, 1992

nside

POLITICS

Hot Races '92

Oakland County's prosecutor
and commision races.

page 48

SPORTS

Cheerleader

A local doctor watches his
Israeli friends at the Olympics.

page 54

Singled Out

Football brought discipline

t o this high school athlete.

age 58

Contents on page 5

c

Sanctuary To Homeless Scientology,

350 volunteers turned Temple Israel
into a week-long shelter for 28 guests.

DAVID KOTZEN-REICH STAFF WRITER

eff Stewart was hanging out
Monday evening by the reg-
istration table at Temple
Israel. He was waiting to be
useful. "I thought I'd vol-
unteer to drive the home-
less around and get to know
them a little better," said
Mr. Stewart, 34.
But another temple volunteer, Nate
Shapiro, had made arrangements for a
bus to pick up the homeless guests each
evening at the South Oakland County
Shelter (SOS) office in Royal Oak.
Mr. Stewart planned to return
Thursday and Friday when drivers
might be needed. In the meantime, he
would stick around.
"We have volunteers who do their shift
and want to come back for more," said
Pam Haron, chairwoman of the temple
shelter committee. "But, logistically,
there are so many volunteers, we have
a problem in trying to find something for
the volunteers to do."
There were 28 homeless guests regis-
tered Monday, the second night of
Temple Israel hosting homeless persons

loseUp:

Women
At The
Helm

Anger has set in.
Frustration is rampant.
Women no longer are
waiting for men to step
aside. Instead, they are
fund-raising. They are
lobbying. They are
running for office. And
they plan to make their
presence felt.

Story on page 26

A court case challenges
religious tax deductions.

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM ASSISTANT EDITOR

E

Jo

HOMELESS/page 14

Synagogues

"Guests" Donna Stewart with
Diana and Daniel.

veryone's favorite time of the
year, when the taxman comes
calling, may become even more
trying for Jews and other religious
communities in the wake of an im-
pending decision by the U.S. Tax
Court.
The court just completed hearings
on a case involving the Church of
Scientology and the Internal Revenue
Service which could challenge the tax-
deductible status of funds given to re-
ligious institutions.
Under current law, individuals are
not taxed on congregational dues or
the purchase of High Holy Day tick-
ets, aliyot to the Torah and synagogue
educational classes. But an IRS case
against the Scientologists charges that
payments for which the donor receives
a service, quid pro quo, are not tax-de-
ductible.
"What's at stake here for the Jewish
community?" said Rabbi David

SCIENTOLOGY/page 30

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