100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 10, 1992 - Image 112

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-07-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS I

Police Investigate
Hit-And-Run Murder

0(e6
-stock 3ov)rnoV\es 3e 5e Poss\o
Ca
oNes\- 6\000- PO
P"c\e
P11 our \c ■
CE FE.ES NO
do`Nc\
?W.

SE.N\CE 0-0C3F3 NOD

OW 100 SEE 1S VAANI 0

ati
btab

u

Mop OS MALL

1

t3i3) 649-2300 °\\
?bone 1° VA° °I 1`1\a0e\a`t
Bekv4eec\GO3\ks&C°6\age
EASY

VkaP\ed

RARE
U.S. COINS
WANTED
1793-1930

Single Coins To Entire Collections
IMMEDIATE FUNDS

Estate Appraisals • Bullion Coins • Precious Metals

All Transactions Held In Strict Confidence
Detroit Metro Dealer for over 20 Years
Dealer & Bank References Available

"Sell Where The Dealers Sell"

BNRN Tr

c

C

OR POP! A TION

spintv_Auiv In

10Q9

189 MERRILL STREET
BIRMINGHAM, MI 48009
(313) 644-1124 FAX (313) 644-3739

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Police
have arrested two Israeli
Arabs charged with the hit-
and-run murder of an Israeli
policeman.
But the case is a criminal
matter unrelated to the in-
tifada and without political
overtones, Police Inspector
General Ya'acov Terner
stressed to reporters after
one of the suspects re- con-
structed the crime.
The victim, Police Sgt.
Erez Merimo, 24, was buried
in Petach Tikvah with full
military honors. He was the
son of another police officer,
Ovadia Merimo, a 33-year
veteran of the force.
Young Sgt. Merimo died in
the course of a car chase
following the burglary of a
building-supplies store in
Kfar Saba.
The first suspect arrested
was described as a 20- year-
old resident of the Israeli
Arab village of Taiba. He
gave police a taped account
of the crime and named two
accomplices, one of whom
was subsequently arrested.
Sgt. Merimo and a fellow
officer were on patrol in
their car when they received
a report of a robbery in pro-
gress in Kfar Saba's main
street.
As they raced to the scene
they saw three men speeding
off in a car subsequently
found to have been stolen
from Afula.
Another police car blocked
the road out of town and Sgt.
Merimo's car halted on the
road to arrest the suspects.
But when Sgt. Merimo got
out of his car to wave them
down, he was deliberately
run over.
He had managed to fire
two shots at the approaching
car before he was hit and
dragged nearly 70 feet to his
death.
The suspects abandoned
their car several hundred
feet down the road and
escaped on foot.
A border police tracker
picked up the footprints of
the two men and followed
them toward Taiba village,
which police say is a "known
haven for burglars and
dealers in stolen property."
Inspector Terner told
reporters that all the
policemen involved in the
incident acted correctly. But
he said the brutal, deliberate
murder of officer Merimo
suggested that the rules for
the pursuit of criminals may
have to be changed.
He also expressed concern

that such a dastardly act by
criminals might provoke
police officers into "extreme
responses beyond what we
would like to see and beyond
the limitations imposed by
law."
During the search for the
Kfar Saba thieves, hundreds
of police raided the homes of
known felons in the Israeli
Arab villages of Tira and
Taiba.
More than 50 suspects
were detained and large
quantities of suspected
stolen property were seized,
including illegal firearms
and stolen auto parts.

Missile Expert
Backs Claims

New York (JTA) — A U.S.
expert who has disputed
Pentagon claims that
American aircraft wreaked
destruction on Iraqi Scud
missiles during the Persian
Gulf War may have vin-
dicated an Israel air force
general who was sharply
rapped this week for saying
essentially the same thing.
The expert, Scott Ritter,
was quoted in a New Yor -
Times article as insisting.
that "no mobile Scud laun-
chers were destroyed during
the war," notwithstanding
elaborate claims to the con-
trary made to American
television audiences by top
military brass.
Mr. Ritter, a former
Marine Corps captain, is a
ballistic missile analyst with
the U.N. commission in
charge of supervising the
destruction of Iraq's
weaponry. He was quoted in
an op-ed piece written by
Mark Crispin Miller.
According to the article,
despite the hype aimed at
generating public enthusi-
asm for the war, U.S. air-
craft failed to find, much less
destroy, most of the Scud
launchers, fixed or mobile.'
The Pentagon declared the
Scud missile sites
"destroyed" on Jan. 16,
1991. A day later, seven
Scuds smashed into Tel
Aviv.
Reserve Maj. Gen. Avihu
Bin-Nun, who commanded
the Israeli air force during
the war, was taken to task
by his own government and
by the United States for say.
ing in an Air Force Day
speech last week that the
United States not only failed
to destroy the Iraqi Scuds
but did not even try.

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan