100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 03, 1992 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS I'

6,
• 1'

NA'AMAT/USA

( shoo

Greater Detroit Council

cordially invites you to attend our

ANNUAL SPIRITUAL ADOPTION LUNCHEON


12:00 Noon

— Supporting Israel's Neediest Children

Thursday, July 16, 1992

BETH ABRAHAM HILLEL MOSES
5075 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfield

honoring

Charlotte Rothstein

Former Mayor Of Oak Park

"Celebration of Women Award"

Modeling/ designs by:
NaAmat Timon Students

Luncheon: $17.00
Minimum Contribution: $36.00
3 Month Scholarship $90 • 6 Month Scholarship $180 • 1 Year Scholarship $360
R.S.V.P. by July 10th — Na'Amat USA Office 967-4750

Top Dollar$ for
Your Collectibles

Ideal for

stain-resist ant
carpet.

No Wet
Mess.

Carpet
Cleaned
Professionally.

A major Detroit area bank asked us to assist them with
an estate collection. The top offer they had received was
just $7,500. We liquidated the collection in less than two
weeks for over $30,000!

Because we work on o consignment basis, the more
dollars we can get for our clients the better we do ourselves.
If you are interested in receiving top dollar for your collec-
tibles, call for a free consultation today.

IC

Richard Charles
Rare Coin Galleries

Michigan's Only Fully-Accredited Coin Dealer
Southfield, Michigan 48075

4000 Prudential Town Center

No water added. Dry cleaning
absorbs and lifts away soil. Wet
methods drive soil deeper into
the carpet.

• No dry time
• Stays cleaner longer
• FREE ESTIMATES
• Eliminates shrinkage,
mildew and water spots
• Saves on carpet replacement

2 ROOMS & HALL

(313) 356-5252

$5900*

DON'T LET HOUSEHOLD PESTS
HOLD YOU HOSTAGE!

CALL THE ERADICO PROFESSIONALS!
Eradicds safe and proven methods keep your
home free of insects, rodents and other pests.
Trust Eradico for an honest assessment of
your needs and dependable, affordable service.

Cockroaches • Ants • Fleas • Bees • Hornets
• Wasps • Rats • Mice and any other pests.
For a FREE inspection and estimate,
Call Today!

Mw to MI. MI AIM AIM.
Ma... =LIM
AIM
IMMI
11111M1111. - 1111JI

or— orma U

IKAr"IIMMOY

ov-lot
■ 11/0 ■ Imp.

CONTROL

Eradicate With Eradico

Michigan's Largest Independent Pest Control Company
For Service Throughout Southeastern Michigan Call: (313) 546-6200

30

FRIDAY. JULY 3. 1992

'Combined areas considered 2 rooms
Rooms over 250 -sq_ ft. slight additional
charge.

The Dry Exhacbon
Carpet Cleanong System

ADVANCE
/PA CARPET CARE

31941 Kingswood Sq. • Farmington Hills

Serving Oakland & Wayne Counties

737-1670

Find It All In
The Jewish News
Classifieds
Call 354-5959

Conservative Rabbis
Trained In Kashrut

New York (JTA) — Super-
vision of restaurants, food
retailers and caterers to en-
sure adherence to the laws of
kashrut has been tradi-
tionally considered the ex-
clusive province of the Or-
thodox.
But, say the Conservative
rabbis attending their
movement's first advanced
training seminar in kashrut
supervision this week, that
is no longer the case.
While relatively few Con-
servative Jews seem to
adhere strictly to the laws of
kashrut, keeping kosher is
indeed a principle central to
the observance of Conser-
vative Jewish law.
But the 65 rabbis who
came to the Jewish Theolog-
ical Seminary in New York
from all over the continent
— from as far away as
Guadalajara, Mexico and
Portland, Ore., — weren't
spurred to attend by a
groundswell of interest
among their congregants in
keeping kosher.
And, as Rabbi Joel Roth
pointed out, "no restaurant
owner is going to get rich by
having my name on his cer-
tificate," because Orthodox
Jews, who make up the bulk
of a kosher restaurant's
patrons, aren't likely to con-
sider Conservative supervi-
sion sufficient.
Rabbi Roth, the incoming
dean of the JTS rabbinical
school, was the educational
consultant and a lecturer on
the program.
The rabbis were there, by
and large, to update their
training so that they can
supervise the kashrut of
kitchens in the local Jewish
community center, hotels,
bakeries, butchers, and
caterers who want to work in
their synagogue social hall.
According to Paul Plotkin,
a Margate, Fla., rabbi who
organized the conference,
the clustering of Orthodox
Jews in big cities has led to
circumstances where in
many cases, a Conservative
rabbi is the most traditional
authority in many towns.
And though there "isn't
any great spike" in the
number of Conservative
Jews observing kashrut,
"there are a certain number
of families who begin keep-
ing kosher each year" in his
community, Rabbi Plotkin
said.
"The Orthodox aren't the
only group with ba'al
teshuvah (newly religious),"
he said, and noted that in his
community, converts

observe kashrut much more
often than those who were
born Jewish.
"This breaks the stereo-
type that the only people
who care about kashrut are
the Orthodox. Many rabbis
are very serious about being
involved and not abdicating
their responsibility," Rabbi
Plotkin said.
Conference organizers ex-
pected 20 people to sign up,
but quickly enrolled a
capacity 65 rabbis and had
to put over a dozen more on a
waiting list.
The five-day training pro-
gram, June 14-18, was
designed to supplement the
theoretical information in-
cluded in training for the
rabbinate and provide the
rabbis with practical train-
ing in kashrut supervision.
While instruction in the
technical minutiae of
kashrut supervision was the
focus, the question of
whether the Conservative
effort might be seen as com-
petition with the Orthodox
for a segment of the
lucrative kosher foods
market was discussed dur-
ing the seminar.
"I do not think that we
should be entirely reliant
upon the Orthodox" for
supervision, said Rabbi
Roth, but "I don't want to es-
tablish 'Conservative
hashgachah (supervision).'
My intention is to provide
hashgachah that serves the
community."
A benefit of the advanced
training for the Conser-
vative movement is that it
makes rabbis more likely to
talk about keeping kosher
from the pulpit.
That way, "it raises the
consciousness of the con-
gregation of the centrality of
kashrut," said Rabbi Elliot
Schoenberg, director of rab-
binic services for the Rab-
binical Assembly.
"It's a stepping stone to
nurture people to be com-
mitted to halacha in gen-
eral," he said, "and to bring
people closer to Jewish life."
The kashrut supervision
conference is the third in a
series of in-service training.
The first, training in the
complexities of gitten, or
Jewish divorce, was ad-
dressed in a seminar which
began in 1987. Shortly
thereafter, the Rabbinical
Assembly began providing
advanced training for rabbis
and Jewish doctors so that
they could work as mohelim,
and perform ritual circumci-
sions.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan