100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 08, 1992 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOCAL NEWS

SPRING COLORS OF BENETTON.

Fisher

Continued from Page 1

THE SPRING 1992 BENETTON AND SISLEY COLLECTIONS.

International colors and styles for the global families in your hometown.

BENETTON

BENETTON

at The Boardwalk

at Laurel Place Park

Orchard Lake Road, South of Maple
737-3737

1-275 at Six Mile Road
953-0500

WEST BLOOMFIELD

"Our Parents and Uncles all got their
mortgages from World Wide Financial."

Melanie & Benjamin Brown

LIVONIA

Dr. Kenneth
Stein

Optometrist

VISION
CARE

NEWBERRY SQUARE

39680 14 Mile Road

N.W. Corner, 14 Mile and Haggerty
Near Shopping Center Mkt.

669-6311

$30
OFF
Complete Pair of

Glasses Or
Prescription Sunglasses

LARGE SELECTION OF
CHILDREN'S FRAMES

Prior Orders and Other Discount
Programs Excluded
limited time offer • expires May 30, 1992

WORLD WIDE
FINANCIAL

THE BEST MORTGAGE RATES.
PERIOD.

Listen for World Wide on WXYT, WWJ & WCAR

647•1199

CALL (313)
1533 N. Woodward • Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304

$30
OFF
Complete Pair of

Contact Lenses
With A Visual Exam

Prior Orders and Other Discount
Programs Excluded

limited time offer • expires May 30, 1992

AMER AN
CANCER
SOCIETY'

Help us keep winning.

cerning religion and Israel.
He said decades ago, the
Orthodox segment of the
community did not par-
ticipate in Federation or
community causes. At Sun-
day's event were Jews of all
denominations, including
Orthodox.
Mr. Fisher said it was im-
portant for Jews to be good
citizens of the city, state and
country where they live. An
advisor to U.S. presidents
and a staunch supporter of
the Republican Party, Mr.
Fisher has been a frequent
worker not only on issues
that are Jewish or involve
Israel, but on concerns fac-
ing the United States. Mr.
Fisher was a founding mem-
ber of New Detroit, Inc. and
other groups that have been
working for 25 years to
revitalize the city.
His third motivation is the
preservation of Jewish life.
Nowhere has that been more
evident than in the recent
Soviet Jewish emigration.
Mr. Fisher was a front-line
player, not only working to
secure the freedom of Soviet
Jews to emigrate, but also
donating and raising funds
to get them here and to
Israel.
For his family, Sunday
was the culmination of what
they've seen happen over
their shared lifetimes.
"It was an emotional day,"
said Mr. Fisher's daughter,
Jane Sherman. "It was ex-
citing, needless to say. It
gave us a chance to do some-
thing for our father that we
haven't had the opportunity
to do. And it's like he said.
It's the highest honor any-
one can pay an individual.
When he is honored, we all
are. Only this was our
chance to give back a little to
a person who has given so
much of himself."
The building, which was
funded privately, cost $1.8
million — under its projected
$2.1 million budget.
Federation moved its
headquarters to the Bloom-
field Township location four
months ago after 40 years at
the Fred M. Butzel Building
in downtown Detroit. The
new location was chosen be-
cause it is central to the Jew-
ish community's demo-
graphic grid.
Graham Orley, president
of the United Jewish Foun-
dation, noted in his opening
remarks that more meetings
have been held in the new
headquarters in four months
than in the previous 20
years at the Butzel Building.
"We're getting constant
attendance at board
meetings and executive
meetings," said Mr. Aron-

son. "In one room, there's a
board meeting going on. In
another, a Women's Division
phonathon. And that's what
is so gratifying about all of
this. People feel wonderful
about the building, but they
don't feel it's excessive or
opulent. It's a working Fed-
eration Building that
happens to look wonderful."
Mr. Aronson said that at
first he had difficulty envi-
sioning the office building as
a future headquarters. The
Federation was considering
building from the ground up
on 13 Mire and Nor-
thwestern. But with costs
prohibitive, Federation
looked for an existing facili-
ty. Mr. Aronson credited de-
veloper and planner Douglas
Etkin with helping him
envision how the building
could look.
"Doug is the unsung hero
here," he said. "When I first
saw the building I thought it
was an okay building. It was
not love at first sight, and it
didn't resemble what it does
now. But Doug Etkin helped

"To be honored by
your own
community is the
highest
tribute anyone
could achieve."

Max Fisher

me see what it could look
like. My biggest anxiety was
faxing a picture to Max. But
he liked it, and he grew to
love it.
"But now," continued Mr.
Aronson, "it's come
together, and it's hard to
relate the original vision to
what we have here now.
Also, to realize the difficulty
of trying to run this
gauntlet, how to move it
here, how to do it without
raising money and hurting
the Campaign."
Mr. Aronson said Federa-
tion's next major project in-
volving a building will be
the renovation and expan-
sion of the Jimmy Prentis
Morris Jewish Community
Center in Oak Park.
Groundbreaking is schedul-
ed for July 12 for the $3 mill-
ion project. Federation must
still raise $750,000 before
the project can go ahead. It
will include the construction
of a swimming pool, aerobic
rooms, a child development
center and renovation of the
existing facility. ❑

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan