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May 01, 1992 - Image 137

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I OBITUARIES]

Dorothy's Not The
Only One Who
Wants To Get
HOME.

Robert Frank,
Active At Beth El

Robert A. Frank, of South-
field, died April 26. He was
38.
A graduate in computer
science from Alfred Univer-
sity, Mr. Frank received a
master's in business from
Wayne State University. He
was former chairman of Tem-
ple Beth El's Torah Study
Group, a member of Temple
Beth El's Men's Club, active
with Temple Beth El Mazon
and an usher during Shabbat
services. He also was past
chairman of the Frank Foun-
dation, which supported
many charitable organiza-
tions, and was a lover of the
musical arts.
He leaves his wife, Deborah;
son and daughter, Michael
and Margaret Sullivan;
parents, Robert L. and Mary;
brothers and sisters-in-law,
Edward and Sarah of Portola
Valley, Calif., Randall and
Ellen of Ann Arbor; sisters
and brothers-in-law, Amy and
Alan Rosenblatt of Short Hill,
N.J., Betsy and Michael Ross
of Raleigh, N.C.

John S. Berman,
Of Lasky Firm

Bloomfield's Best:
From Elegant Win
To Lakeside Living

CHEF'S SPECIAL:
Sizzling News For

Upscale Kitchens

HOW TO BE A WINNER
IN THE '90s COLOR WAR

In The Monet Mood:
bnquil Water Gardens

ur 125,000 readers do too! Because it's filled with a tradi-
tional charm of the past and a wondrous look into the
future. First, we'll see the enchanting Frank Lloyd Wright-
inspired dining decor of a magnificent West Bloomfield tudor with
other classic furnishings. Then, we'll see the future in an automated
Smart Home of the 21st century. And from inner space we'll travel
to the wars. . .The Color Wars. Here we'll discover the incredible
color schemes and dreams top decorators will be declaring for the 90's.
From there we go Home On The Range and learn why
more and more commercial appliances are finding a
home. . . in the home. Want to know
what's going on at home, look for our
new Spring HOME. It's more than
what even Dorothy wished for. Being
mailed to you next week. Another
bonus for Jewish News subscribers.

Published by The Jewish News.

27676 Franklin Road
Southfield, MI 48034
313-354-6060

John "Jimmy" S. Berman,
of Orchard Lake, died April
22. He was 60.
Mr. Berman was the
founder in 1951 of the Park
Furniture Co., which merged
in 1973 with the Lasky Fur-
niture Co. Mr. Berman serv-
ed as Lasky president and
CEO.
Mr. Berman was a life
member of Temple Israel, and
was active with the Allied
Jewish Campaign and the
Crohn's and Colitis Founda-
tion of America.
He leaves his wife, Bernice;
sons and daughters-in-law,
Richard and Marilyn of West
Bloomfield, Robert and Cindy
of West Bloomfield, Ron and
Bunny of West Bloomfield,
Kenneth and Kimberly of
Farmington Hills, Andrew
and Shelley of Novi; sister,
Molly Grekin of Sarasota,
Fla.; nine grandchildren.

War Hero
Dies In Rome

New York (JTA) — George
Mandel-Mantello, who as a
Salvadoran diplomat during
World War II saved numerous
Jews and non-Jews from the
Nazis, died April 26 at his
home in Rome. He was 90.
Mr. Mandel-Mantello, a
Romanian-born Jew who ob-
tained Salvadoran citizen-

ship in 1939, was regarded
as one of the unsung heros of
the Holocaust. It was not un-
til 1989 that he was first
commended for his wartime
deeds, by being presented
with the Eleanor Roosevelt
Human Rights Award.
As first secretary of the
Salvadoran Consulate in
Geneva from 1942 to 1945,
he mass produced and
distributed some 15,000
Salvadoran citizenship pa-
pers to Jews and non-Jews
throughout Nazi-occupied
Europe. About 95 percent of
the holders of these papers
are believed to have surviv-
ed the Holocaust.
During the summer of
1944, when the Nazis and
their Hungarian collab-
orators began deporting
100,000 Jews a day to
Auschwitz, Mr. Mandel-
Mantello obtained firsthand
reports from two escapees.
He then circulated to the
international media his
"Auschwitz Protocol," a 30-
page description of the camp,
complete with statistical
data and descriptions of the
killings. Some 1.6 million
Jews are believed to have
died at Auschwitz.
This report led to interna-
tional calls by world leaders
to halt the deportations.
Following the war, Mr.
Mandel-Mantello helped
church and political figures
escape from Communist
Hungary through Switzer-
land.
Funeral services for
Mandel-Mantello were held
this week in Jerusalem.

NEWS

rm.. .

Students Charge
Censorship

Rome (JTA) — Students at
a junior high school in nor-
thern Italy have complained
angrily that their edition of
Primo Levi's Auschwitz
memoir, If This is a Man,
has been censored.
Pupils attending the Can-
dido Cezzano school in the
city of Bergamo made the
complaint in a letter to the
left-wing local newspaper, Il
Manifesto.
They pointed to passages
in the original work dealing
in blunt terms with bodily
functions and mentioning
homosexuality that do not
appear in their school edi-
tion. They said they were
offended by the "needless,
counterproductive,
disrespectful censorship."
But the Einaudi
-publishing house insists the
deletions were made by the
author in school texts.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

137

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