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March 27, 1992 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

Levin To Face Off
In New District

NOAM M.M. NEUSNER

Staff Writer

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wader Levin's political
ship just took a
torpedo.
And Southfield's voters,
who for the last 10 years
have been represented by
one congressman, are being
divvied up into two congres-
sional districts.
Mr. Levin, the U.S. con-
gressman from Southfield,
will have to face-off with col-
league Dennis Hertel of
Harper Woods to keep his
seat in Congress. For the
last 10 years, he has repre-
sented a group of suburbs
hugging Detroit's border.
Now, much of that district
has been cut away, and an
eastern section of Oakland
County, with a small part of
Southfield, will be combined
with parts of western
Macomb County.
The upcoming political
face-off between the
Democrats is required by a
court-instituted redistricting
plan. Every 10 years, con-
gressional districts are ad- •
justed to account for popula-
tion shifts.
Michigan is losing two
representatives, and many
political experts believe that
both will be Democrats.
Sander Levin could be one of
them.
The five-term incumbent is
upbeat about his chances,
however. "I will be as active
as ever," he said Wednes-
day. "People will continue to
see a lot of me."
But his re-election cam-
paign is already an uphill
battle. Mr. Levin will have
only 31 percent of his old
district in the new one, the
12th. By comparison, Rep.
Hertel will keep 49 percent
of his district, although he
will have to move from his
native Harper Woods into
the new district.
Mr. Levin is disappointed,
however, that the federal
court panel chose to divide
Southfield voters into two
districts.
"I had urged the court to
keep Southfield, Oak Park,
Huntington Woods and
Pleasant Ridge together," he
said. "In terms of com-
munities of interest, it
makes much more sense to
keep the Jewish population
together, the Chaldean
population together and the

Staff writer Kimberly Lifton
contributed to this story.

Sander Levin:
Facing a battle.

African-American popula-
tion together."
Some political experts in
Lansing were speculating
over Mr. Levin's fate in a
match against Mr. Hertel,
also popular among his cur-
rent constituents.
Rep. Maxine Berman, D-
Southfield, who is the state
reapportionment chair, said
she urged Mr. Levin to move
into the new 11th District,

"In terms of
communities of
interest, it makes
much more sense
to keep the Jewish
population
together.".

Sander Levin

now represented by Rep.
William Broomfield.
State Rep. David
Honigman, R-West Bloom-
field, has launched his own
campaign to unseat Mr.
Broomfield. Mr. Honigman,
who said he already has
much Jewish support, said
redistricting is beneficial to
him, strengthening his sup-
port base.
Mr. Levin said he would
stay put.
He already has started
campaigning for November's
elections, having visited
Macomb County on Tuesday.
He also said he will con-
tinue to emphasize the
issues of jobs, industrial
decline and health care.
"Now I have to work with
it," he said. "I can win in the
12th. I'll just have to work
hard to keep it together." Li

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