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February 21, 1992 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BACKGROUND

Plante & Moran

in cooperation with the

American-Israel Chamber of Commerce of Michigan

and

Shared Civility

Continued from preceding page

American-Israel Education Institute

cordially invite you to
o Business Luncheon and Seminar on

"Business Opportunities in Israel for Your Company and Clients"

Keynote Speaker: Joseph (Yossie) Shachak, CPA

President, Institute of CPAs in Israel
Founder and Managing Partner of Shachak & Co.

Followed by a Panel of International Business Specialists:
• A Case Study — Mark Kahn, president, Production Tool Supply, Inc.
• Tax Implications — Emerson J. Addison, tax partner, Plante & Moran
• Legal Implications — Michael Eizelman, partner, Silver, Gould, Eizelman Zollor & Jackier

Friday, February 28, 1992
DATE:
12:00 to 1:30 p.m.
TIME:
LOCATION: Radisson Plaza Hotel at Town Center
1500 Town Center
Southfield, Michigan 48075
$20 per person, includes lunch and seminar
COST:

Note: Reservations are limited to the first 75 respondents.

For more information contact Shelly Korner Jackier at the American Israel Chamber

of Commerce office at (313) 661-1948, or Kristin B. Brender, Plante & Moran at
(313) 352-2500.

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Call 354-5959

ested in helping their own
communities first. Also, re-
ligious schools are not inter-
ested in having their
students mingle with Arab
children and social pressure
often reverses any gains
made in an otherwise suc-
cessful program.
Israeli Arabs, in addition
to trying to improve their re-
lationship with Jews, also
face a host of more pressing
problems.
Arab schools are often
understaffed, overcrowded
and lack computers and
proper libraries. Arab
graduates of universities
have trouble finding work.
"There isn't an equality,"
said Fouzi el-Asmar, a jour-
nalist who was born in Haifa
and raised in Lod (Lydda).
"We don't have the same
rights."
But to its supporters, pro-
grams like Neve Shalom are
crucial steps, albeit small
ones.
"It's a very powerful sym-
bol of the ability of Jews and
Arabs to live together," said
David Arnow, North Ameri-
can chair of the New Israel
Fund (NIF).
Mr. el-Asmar said private
efforts are welcomed by most
Israeli Arabs, but more
widespread assistance is
needed.
"It's a good gesture of
some good Israelis," he said.
"But that doesn't make the
policy of the State of Israel."
NIF, the largest founda-
tion 'devoted to Arab-Jewish
coexistence, is currently
upgrading its image. Robert
S. Greenberger, writing in
the Baltimore Jewish Times,
said several former sup-
porters of NIF have been
disappointed by the founda-
tion's turn toward greater
professionalization and less
grassroots fund raising.
"They had tapped a vein of
discontent among their con-
temporaries —wealthy lib-
erals of the 1960s activist
generation who were in-
creasingly disturbed by
what they saw in Israel,"
wrote Mr. Greenberger.
Last year, NW raised more
than $8 million, a hundred-
fold improvement since it
was founded 12 years ago.
While some critics harp on
the relative size of NIF and
other efforts to promote Jew-
ish-Arab coexistence,
several Jewish leaders said
that it is important work.
"There is a danger of
overlooking the value of an
Israeli society where Arabs
have an equal standing and
fair share," said Rabbi Irv-
ing Greenberg, president of
National Jewish Center for
Learning and Leadership

(CLAL). "There isn't a great
tradition of democracy and
minority sensitivity to draw
on (in Israel)."
At the same time, Rabbi
Greenberg said Israelis have
developed a "remarkable"
tolerance of Arab citizens,
considering their constant
state of war with Arab
nations.
"These projects are signifi-
cant, at least to lay the
groundwork for when we
really need some help," he
said. "Even though right
now they're marginal."
In a 1991 background
report published for the
American Jewish Corn-
mittee, community relations
expert Kenneth Bandler
wrote that the coexistence
field is growing in Israel, but
that only a peaceful set-
tlement of the Arab-Israeli
conflict and a narrowing of

"The roots of
democracy in
Israel are
shallower than we
thought."

David Arnow

the economic gap between
Israel's Arabs and Jews
would ultimately create true
harmony.
"Continuing to ignore the
social and economic needs of
the Arab minority could
turn the prevailing Jewish
perception of Arab citizens
as a fifth column into a self-
fulfilling prophecy," Mr.
Bandler wrote.
Although each foundation
believes that the coexistence
projects work, they acknowl-
edge that there is a long way
to go. They also admit that
support for Arab civil rights
must come from within
Israel, and not from some
"big brother" in America.
Dr. Kronish of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee said
Israel's Ministry of Edu-
cation runs programs on
democracy and stereotypes,
and that Israelis are sen-
sitive to the problems of
Israel's Arabs. Coexistence
programs are a "deep secret
in the West," he said, and
should not be regarded as an
exception.
Mr. Arnow of NIF said
hatred of Arabs is viewed by
many in Israel as a threat to
Israel's tenuous democratic
values. Still, he said, much
work has to be done.
"The roots of democracy in
Israel are shallower than we
thought," he said. "Israel is
just beginning to deal with
the questions of what it's go-
ing to become."

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