100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

February 07, 1992 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TORAH PORTION I

Handicapism.
It's Thinking
That People
With Disabilities
Are Different.

People with disa-
bilities are really like
the rest of us—diverse,
complex, each with
different strengths
and weaknesses,
likes and dislikes.

Sometimes they
may need more help
than you do. But they
always need a smile,
a hello, respect and
dignity. Just like you.

Treat every person
you meet like a
person. It's as simple
as that.

Wi

A Jewish Association for Residential Care
for persons with developmental disabilities

28366 Franklin Road Southfield, MI 48034 (313) 352-5272

DISCOVER THE CYNTHIA DEWOLr- LINE
OF SMART SUITING FOR FULLER FIGURED
WOMEN. MEET THIS NATIONALLY RE-
COGNIZED DESIGNER AT qt1LENTINtl .. .

(1 4.0 C
9 EP P ,,c30"

-

40—

• 36ursoiczy, 5e6ruary 13/A, fron2 I 2 /9
• cSalurolay, 5e6ruary ASIA, from II fo 6

e cbeese
if! be set°eJ

fi

SEE HER NEW LINE OF HAND MADE SPRING SUITS FOR CAREER OR SPECIAL
OCCASION WEAR.
HNC YOUR PURCHASES CUSTOM FITTED FOR YOUR SPECIAL NEEDS.
HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE.

APPLEGATE SQUARE • 29799 NORTHWESTERN HWY. • SOUTHHELD, MI 48034 • (313) 354-4560

Don't Clip That Coupon!

You Won't Need It At

One

pRicE Cleaners

TAMAROFF
BUICK

All items are only $2.79*
each and everyday!
Highest Quality Cleanling!
Shirts .99e everyday!

(hangers only)
Same Day Service ■ Price Subject To
Advance Payment ■ 2-Piece Minimum.
31217 14 Mile Road a 932.3222

at the Triangle at 14 Mile and Orchard Lake Rd.
(next to Office Max) *No household items or fancy
garments, some restrictions apply.

44

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992

AL HARRIS

NO. 1 IN SALES
FOR DETROIT AREA

Telegraph & 12 Mile

353-1300

UI



The Sanctuary:
A Spiritual Symbol

RABBI RICHARD C. HERTZ

Special to The Jewish News

S

cripture tells with lov-
ing detail the story of
the construction of the
sanctuary that was to be the
symbol of God's love for the
children of Israel and the
place where His presence
could be seen.
Now that Israel had been
redeemed from bondage in
Egypt and God had given His
commandments at Sinai,
Moses is bidden to erect a
sanctuary that would be a
visible emblem to the people
that God dwells among them.
With the revelation at Sinai
having taken place, prepara-
tions are now made for the
spiritual welfare of the people
during their long journey
through the wilderness on
their way to the Promised
Land.
The symbol of God's con-
tinued presence in the midst
of Israel is the purpose of the
construction of the taber-
nacle. It was not designed, as
our modern places of worship
are, for communal use; rather
it was to be the public symbol
of the cult of Israel.
The building of the taber-
nacle in no way confined God
to only a single site. The rab-
bis of the Midrash compare
the tabernacle to a cave by
the sea which is constantly
filled by sea water although
the sea is not diminished. In
like manner the Divine
presence in the world was not
diminished by having filled
the tabernacle.
This portable sanctuary
was known by several names.
As a mishkan, it was the
dwelling place of God among
Israel. As an ohel mo'ed, it
was a tent of meeting where
God reveals himself to man.
Finally, the tabernacle is
sometimes called a mikdash,
a sanctuary, where the Holy
of Holies was identified.
Our sedra opens with a list
of basic materials needed for
the construction of the taber-
nacle and all the precious
materials, its equipment and
the variety of things which
were voluntarily contributed
by the people (Exodus 25,
verse 2).
Gifts for the Divine taber-
nacle were to come from
"every person whose heart so
moves him." Ever since that
time, the construction of
every synagogue has come
about as a result of voluntary

Dr. Hertz is rabbi emeritus of
Temple Beth El.

UI

contributions from among the
people.
The sanctuary was to be a
symbol, its purpose being to
impress the children of Israel
with spiritual teachings, to
win the Israelites from
idolatrous worship and turn
them toward God. The people
had to be constantly remind-
ed that God dwelt in their
midst, that God was holy and
so must the Israelites become
holy.
The sanctuary was to be the
embodiment of Israel's con-
cept of holiness. Moreover, the
sacrifices were to be
equalitarian. The poor man's
gift was on a par with the rich
man's contribution.
What was to be inside the
tabernacle? The two tablets of
the law were to dwell inside
to remind the people of their
covenant.
The ark was to house the
tablets of stone.
The sedra continues with
the instruction for the design

Shabbat Teruma
Exodus 25:1-27:19
1 Kings 5:26-6:13

of a seven-branch menorah.
Very detailed instructions are
given, although no informa-
tion is mentioned concerning
the material, from which the
lamps were to be made, except
that the branches were to be
of one piece beaten of pure
gold. Perhaps its primary
function was utilitarian to il-
luminate the area around it
at nighttime. What is signifi-
cant is the number seven,
which is the outstanding
symbolic number in the Bible.
Somehow the number seven
was thought to express com-
pleteness and perfection. God
is shown here as the giver of
life. History shows that the
seven-branch candlestick of
the menorah remained a sym-
bol of Judaism and in later
post-biblical times became a
frequent pictorial motif in
early synagogues, tombs and
artifacts, culminating in its
adoption as the emblem of the
modern state of Israel.

-4

UI

-4

UI

UI





41



On Nov. 6, 1884, in Kat-
towicz, 35 delegates from
Russia, Romania, Germany,
England and France estab-
lished the Hovevei Zion
(Lovers of Zion) movement,
whose purpose was the pro-
motion of Jewish settlement
in the Land of Israel. Leon
Pinsker was elected chair-
man.



Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan