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February 07, 1992 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

CONGREGATION

SHAAREY ZEDEK

1

2

MEMBERSHIP

TUITION FREE

Membership affiliation
with Congregation
Shaarey Zedek
brings involvement and
participation.

Kindergarten thru
Fifth Grades
provided tuition free
to children of
Members.

TAKE TWO STEPS
IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

Weekday
afternoon classes
Hillel Day School
Building

Sunday
morning classes
Congregation
Shaarey Zedek

Pre-School
Transfer Students
through 12th
Accepted.
grade classes
Materials, book fees
available
not included.
For information call: Leonard P. Baruch or Arline Gould at 357-5544

CONGREGATION SHAAREY ZEDEK

HOME OFFICE

techline®

studio

SAVE

OFF LIST
EVERYDAY

TECHLINE FURNITURE:

■ PERFECT FOR HOME OR OFFICE
■ COLORS: ANTIQUE WHITE,

WHITE/WHITE, BLACK AND GRAY

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TIMELESS STYLING
• MADE IN THE USA WITH A
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ROYAL OAK FARMINGTON HILLS EAST LANSING ANN ARBOR

304 S. Main Street
544-3090

36

32431 Northwestern 2043 East Grand River 341 East Liberty
737-5510
(517) 3364900
741-9700

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1992

AJE Schools

Continued from preceding page

on how the report will be
implemented — a process
which will begin when Fed-
eration President Mark
Schlussel names the
implementation committee.
Synagogue leaders wonder
how long the process will
take, how much assistance
they will receive from Fed-
eration and how they will
compensate for AJE's expe-
rience in running a school.
"We will have a school,"
said Dr. Harry Maisel, pres-
ident of Adat Shalom. "The
plan right now is to mobilize
resources to run a school."
Having to take full respon-
sibility for the school that
exists in its building will
cost Adat Shalom about
$100,000. That figure,
however, may go down as
synagogue leaders evaluate
their needs.
But Adat Shalom is con-
sidered wealthy compared to
Beth Achim, a congregation
which is already struggling
with a number of difficult
issues.
One of the goals of the
report is to have congrega-
tions do the reaching out to
unaffiliated parents through
their schools. For Beth
Achim, this may be difficult.
The Beth Achim branch of
AJE has not been tradi-
tionally associated with the
synagogue: about 10 percent
of students in the branch are
children of synagogue mem-
bers.
The synagogue is therefore
expected to push recruit-
ment to get unaffiliated
parents to join Beth Achim.
That, plus the recent rejec-
tion of a proposal to merge
with Congregation B'nai
Moshe, is forcing the con-
gregation to make a number
of critical decisions all at
once.
"Right now, the synagogue
hasn't been able to do much
thinking about the report,"
said Rabbi Martin Berman
of Beth Achim. "But I'd like
to see Beth Achim take over
the program."
Rabbi Berman criticized
the Federation's proposal for
not clarifying how the report
will be implemented.
Implementation will not
begin until June, 1992. Un-
til that program is announc-
ed, Rabbi Berman said, it
will be difficult for his syn-
agogue to plan its future.
"It's a financial burden
that we're now going to have
to'bear," he said.
For Shir Tikvah in Troy,
the impending end of AJE's
sponsorship of its school will
represent a major change.
For one, it was AJE's branch
in Troy which brought

together the Reform con-
gregation.
"I'm completely optimistic
we will make the transition
successfully," said Rabbi
Arnold Sleutelberg. "Right
now, we're not equipped to
do that. We don't have the
resources or the expertise."
Rabbi Sleutelberg said the
congregation would rely
heavily on assistance from
AJE and the Jewish Federa-
tion to learn how to run the
school on its own. This, he
said, presents a unique op-
portunity.
"We're all experimenting
how to do it best," he said.
"Because we're starting
from scratch, we can try new
things." ❑

-4

Voting •

Continued from Page 1

of the Democratic party.
Democrats can, however,
announce their party
preference on election day at
the polling station.
With all of the confusion
over election rules, political
pundits are advising
registered voters to select a
party preference._ Those
.unhappy with declaring par-
ty preferences can remove
the label on March 18, the
day after the primary.
State election rules have
augmented concerns in the
community at a time when

The Republican
Party has not
endorsed Mr.
Duke's candidacy.

two candidates on the Mich-
igan ballot have been la-
beled racist and anti-
Semitic. Mr. Duke and syn-
dicated columnist Patrick
Buchanan — the other can-
didate facing allegations of
racism and anti-Semitism —
will appear on Michigan's
Republican primary ballot
against Mr. Bush.
The Republican Party has
not endorsed Mr. Duke's
candidacy and has indicated
that Mr. Duke does not rep-
resent the interests of the
party.
Appearing on the Dem-
ocratic primary ticket will
be Arkansas Gov. Bill Clin-
ton, former California Gov.
Jerry Brown, Iowa Sen. Tom
Harkin, former Massachu-
setts Sen. Paul Tsongas and
Nebraska Sen. Robert Kerrey.
Most leaders of Jewish
organizations say they will
not tell people how to vote.
Last month, Rabbi A. Ir-
win Schnipper. used the
Shabbat pulpit to urge his
congregants at Beth Abra-

II

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