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January 31, 1992 - Image 54

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-01-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I TRAVEL Immi"'

Jewish Experiences For Families
L'Chayim Jewish News
Jewish Community Center

Presents

Ha-Olam

Our World

ppr.i

Tikkun-Olam
Repairing
Our World

HA-OLAM:
A JEWISH EARTH DAY
CELEBRATION

Sunday, February 9, 1992
1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Jewish Community Center
Maple-Drake Building

Featuring:

Musical Entertainment,
Storytelling and

"Endangered
Species"

Introducing

JEFF etc.

A Program for Preteen
Families

Bring:

A Live Animal
Show By

Newspapers, Plastic Bottles, Coffee Cans
with lids, Milk Cartons for

The Living
Science
Foundation

ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE
Collection, Crafts
and LOTS, LOTS MORE .. .

r ERIENCES FOR r

1 1)Ing newish Families G t

Fresh Air Society

54

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1992

FUN FOR
THE WHOLE
FAMILY!!

Jewish Community Center Agency for Jewish Education

Hong Kong

Continued from preceding page

bi is attached to the synag-
gue, but visiting rabbis of-
ficiate at Reform services.
Religious education is given
at the Jewish Club, and bar
mitzvahs are regular occur-
rences at the synagogue.
The most striking figure is
in the divergence of national
representation. A recent poll
at the Jewish Club found 38
percent from the U.S., 16 per-
cent from Israel and 23 per-
cent from the U.K., with the
rest from virtually every
European country, as well as
Africa, Iraq, Lebanon and
China. Never estimated are
the number of Jewish tourists
to Hong Kong. In the four ma-
jor incentives — shopping,
food, history and the gateway
to China — Hong Kong has
provisions for the most varied
tastes.
Many older American Jews
thrive in the old markets off
Cat Street, the lanes near
Possession Point, and the

Those with pure
kosher tastes until
recently have had
to eat in the
numerous
vegetarian
restaurants.

streets of Nathan Road. lb
them, the scurrying, haggling
and cheap treasures are
reminiscent of New York's
Rivington Street and the
Lower East Side in 1900.
Food is certainly
cosmopolitan, but those who
are kosher or at least want a
taste of home have many
choices. Some dozen delica-
tessens are situated around
Hong Kong, so those with a
longing for hot pastrami,
bagels or corned beef are easi-
ly satisfied. Those with pure
kosher tastes until recently
have had to eat in the
numerous vegetarian restaur-
ants. Chinese vegetarian food
— mainly based around
mushrooms, greens and bean-
curd — is healthy and
delicious, though guests
should request that lard not
be used in frying the dishes.
Close to kosher are the
Moslem Chinese restaurants.
No pork of any kind is served
here, though milk and meat
products will usually be cook-
ed in the same pan. The Pek-
ing Muslim restaurants are
usually cleaner and more
wholesome than the Can-
tonese. The former, though,
usually have mutton dishes,
while Cantonese has a wider
variety of chicken and beef.
The Jewish Club opened
their kosher restuarant to the
public as of October 1991. The
King David Room has a full

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