100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 10, 1992 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I INSIDE WASHINGTON I

Don't miss this

7-HOUR
SALE!

Refugee Cuts May
Threaten Ex-USSR Jews

ONE DAY ONLY!

SATURDAY • JANUARY 1 1

10 AM - 5 PM

0/70 EVERYTHING

OFF

WALL

TO WALL

Fine Designer Furniture at Fantastic Savings!
ELLO • CENTURY • BERNHARDT
A great selection of leather from DANSEN & NATUZZI
Plus...all merchandise from our 1991 HOMEARAMA HOME!

SHERWOOD STUDIOS

Fine Furniture & Accessories
24760 Crestview Ct. • Farmington Hills

476-3760 (Day of Sale) • 354-9060 (Prior to Sale)

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY NOMINAL CHARGE
GROUPS SOLD AS COMPLETE SETS
PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED

ALL SALES FINAL

WE HAVE A

REPUTATION TO

American Protective Alarms' own 24 hour, cen-
tral monitoring station is the safest, smartest way
to protect your home, business or property. We've
been protecting homes like yours for over 25
years. Today's systems are more advanced, more
affordable and simpler to use than ever before.

AMERICAN
PROTECTIVE
® ALARMS

864-8600

30

HOLD UP
FIRE
BURGLAR

FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1992

FOR A GREAT DEAL
ON A GREAT CAR, CALL
HAROLD WIERNIK

GLOSSMOM
1-1YUNDOI

On reiegtapn at tne fel.12 Mal! Southfield

3543300

Z ORIENTAL RUGS

PROPERTY PROTECTED BY

THE FINEST
IN HOME
SECURITY
SINCE 1968

congressional budget pro-
cess. There, they could
become political fodder in a
year in which refugee and
immigration programs may
be enticing scapegoats for a
recession-battered elec-
torate.
"Private discussions are
going on at the very highest
stages," said Mark
Talisman, Washington di-
rector for the Council of Jew-
ish Federations. "This has
the potential to be a genuine
disaster for the people who
run very effective, efficient
refugee programs."
Mr. Talisman has met
with HSS Secretary Louis
Sullivan in an attempt to nip
the rumored cuts in the bud.
Other Jewish activists have
been weighing in with a
variety of administration
and congressional represen-
tatives.

Gearing Up For
Political Conventions

WAREHOUSE

PROTECT

Jewish activists are conti-
nuing their furious, behind-
the-scenes effort to preserve
programs that provide assis-
tance to refugees entering
this country, including Jews
from the former USSR.
Several weeks ago, it
became clear that the Office
of Management and Budget
and the Department of
Health and Human Services
(HSS) were considering dras-
tic funding cuts for the Of-
fice of Refugee Reset-
tlement.
Especially hard hit would
be cash and medical assis-
tance programs and the
matching grant programs
that have been critical to
efforts to resettle Soviet
Jews through a unique part-
nership of Jewish groups
and government agencies.
Jewish activists are anx-
ious to head off the proposed
cuts before they enter the

<

We buy them, sell them,

appraise them, clean them

lepClif them

and Love them!

In-Home & Office
Carpet Cleaning

(313) 399-2323

OAK PARK OUTLET • 546-RUGS
BIRMINGHAM • 646 - RUGS
ANN ARBOR • 973 - RUGS

Now that 1992 has dawn-
ed, Jewish politicos are mov-
ing into high gear to prepare
for this year's political wars.
The National Jewish
Democratic Council (NJDC),
a Washington-based group of
Jewish Democrats devoted
to cementing the traditional
bond between Jews and their
party, has opened its first
state chapter.
Last week's activities took
place in Denver, with a
kickoff event at the Colorado
governor's mansion.
NJDC officials say the
event drew more than 200
activists from around the
state, plus representatives of
the six Democratic hopefuls,
who signed up volunteers
and prospected for campaign
money.
In New York, the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions of America, the New
York Jewish Community
Relations Council and the
New York regional office of
the American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
have banded together to
train Jews interested in be-
ing delegates at the Dem-
ocratic or Republican na-
tional conventions this
summer.
"The hope is that of the
people who were invited,
maybe 10 or 15 will actually
run to be delegates," said
the OU's William Rapfogel.
"They can then play an im-

portant role by speaking up
with pro-Israel positions as
the parties develop their
platforms."
The program could become
a model for communities
around the country, said
JCRC's executive director,
Michael Miller.
"We are not interested in
promoting one candidate or
one party," he said. "But we
are interested in serving as a
catalyst for greater par-
ticipation by the Jewish
community."

AJCongress
Census Reform

Activism in pursuit of
seemingly boring issues may
occasionally pay strategic
dividends.
Such was the case when
the American Jewish Con-
gress testified last October
before a House subcom-
mittee about the role of
minority groups in the cen-
sus of 1990.
The AJCongress was con-
cerned that the Census Bu-
reau had not tapped the spe-
cial expertise of organiza-
tions in minority com-
munities to assure that eth-
nic groups responded fully to
the national head count.
As a result, the census
may have seriously under-
counted minority groups, in-
cluding Soviet Jews. Under-
counts translate into fewer

••1

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan