100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 03, 1992 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-01-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

Parents for Torah for All Children

Israelis Differ
On Nuclear Threat

MICHIGAN CHAPTER

You are cordially invited to our
11th Annual Dinner

Sunday, January 12, 1992
6:00 Cocktails
7:00 Dinner
Congregation Dovid Ben Nochum
14800 W. Lincoln Dr., Oak Park, Michigan

Couvert: $50.00

No solicitations

RSVP
Sara Shoenig
Gail Perczyk
968-8072
967-4475

Maybe it doesn't
exactly lie. but it
doesn't tell the
whole truth either.

Body Composi-
tionAnalysis.does.
A Body Comp

tells you your lean-
to-fat ratio, your
body fat percen-
tage, your ideal
weight, and caloric
requirements.

If you are plann-
ing. to lose weight,
make sure you lose
fat.
For a FREE
Body Composi

Winter
Clearance

SALE

Greg

SHOE S

ORCHARD MALL

EVERGREEN PLAZA

851 5566
w. Bloomfield

S59 3580

-

-

Southfield

Serving the Community for 35 Years

GET YOUR NEXT PAIR OF

SANSABELT

slacks at a sensible price.
Why pay more when we
offer them at discount?
We even include FREE
tailoring. Discount prices
start at:

$36plenty

of
free parking
behind our store

sizes 32-60
JOHN R MEN'S WEAR

543-4646 .

M-Th 9:30-6:30, Fri. & Sat. 9:30-8, Sun. 11-5

IPmils & John R Take 1-75 to 9 Mile

18

FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, 1992

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Israelis
generally agree that one or
more of their neighbors in
the region will become a
nuclear power in the near
future. But they clash along
ideological lines over how to
confront the potential
threat.
Shimon Peres, chairman of
the Labor Party, believes the
best way is to come to terms
with the Arab states, which
he says can be achieved only
through territorial com-
promise.
Mr. Peres, a former prime
minister and ex-minister of
defense who is considered
the father of Israel's nuclear
program, reasoned that in
the age of long-range mis-
siles, territorial buffers have
become meaningless.
Missiles "nullified" the
importance of borders, time
and distance, Mr. Peres said.
"Non-conventional weapons
diminished the importance
of conventional military
forces."
Yuval Ne'eman, leader of
the ultranationalist Tehiya
party, called that approach
"nonsense" at a recent con-
ference at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity.
According to Mr. Ne'eman,
who is minister of science
and energy in the Likud-led
coalition government, only
countries that have never
been invaded and occupied
— such as Australia, Britain
and the United States — can
dismiss the importance of
territorial depth.
"A nation in danger of be-
ing occupied and slaugh-
tered shouldn't worry about
missiles" because it has
bigger problems, Mr.
Ne'eman said.
He rejected Mr. Peres'
argument that Israel must
make peace to avert nuclear
war. "If Iran will have a
nuclear bomb and an oppor-
tunity to attack Israel, it
will do so whether or not
Israel agrees to the creation
of a Palestinian state," Mr.
Ne'eman said.
Israel's answer to the
nuclear threat must be
"different," he added
without elaboration.
Israel is widely believed to
have a substantial stockpile
of nuclear weapons in its
own arsenal, though it has
never confirmed or denied
such reports.
But it is increasingly
aware of the potential
nuclear threat from its
neighbors. Defense Minister
Moshe Arens discussed the

danger of nuclear prolifera-
tion in the region last week
at a meeting of the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee.
"We have to prepare with
the assumption that the
Middle East is nuclearizing
and at the same time, we
have to make our contribu-
tion to stopping the process,"
Mr. Arens said.
Gen. Amnon Shahak, the
deputy chief of staff, told
military correspondents last
week that the Israel Defense
Force is considering the
threat of nuclear attack.
It is not imminent,
"certainly not in 1992,"
Gen. Shahak said.
But it might develop later
and the IDF is duty-bound to
draw up contingency plans,
he said.
It is keeping a close watch
and has received additional
funds to conduct "long-term
intelligence planning and
operations," the general
disclosed.
He explained that this in-
cluded a close watch on the

If Iran will have a
nuclear bomb and
an opportunity to
attack Israel, it
will do so whether
or not Israel
agrees to the
creation of a
Palestinian state.

effects of the breakup of the
Soviet Union and the possi-
bility that Soviet nuclear
scientists and engineers will
find themselves jobless and
will seek employment for
their know-how in Arab or
other countries.
Reserve Maj. Gen. Ya'akov
Lapidot, director general of
the Police' Ministry and a
former adviser to the
Defense Ministry, told the
Tel Aviv University con-
ference that it would be
foolhardy not to take seri-
ously the ability of Iraq or
Iran to acquire nuclear
weapons.
According to Mr. Arens,
between 10,000 and 20,000
people in Iraq are working in
the nuclear field. Despite
U.N. inspection teams, the
Iraqis manage to conceal
part of their activities, he
said.
The defense minister said
that while China has still
not signed an agreement for
the sale of a nuclear reactor

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan