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December 13, 1991 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I DETROIT

L -aikA"_-a

EXPERIENCE THE ART OF HOLIDAY SHOPPING

Proposal Could Outlaw
Out-Of-School Sports

NOAM M.M. NEUSNER

Staff Writer

A

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18

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proposal by a group of
high school athletic
directors could spell
doom for many extra-
curricular sports leagues.
Under the proposal, an
athlete who plays for his
high school in a particular
sport would not be allowed to
compete with any other offi-
cial team in that sport dur-
ing the school year.
The proposal, issued last
week by an ad hoc com-
mittee of athletic admin-
istrators, will be discussed
and voted on at the May
meeting of the represent-
ative council of the Michigan
High School Athletic
Association (MHSAA).
Early concern that the
Jewish Community Center
North American Maccabi
Youth Games would be af-
fected by the proposal were
dispelled because they take
place outside of the school
year.
If passed, the proposal
would disallow high school
swimmers from par-
ticipating on both their high
school team and a U.S.
Swimming team. Under the
proposal, soccer athletes
would not be allowed to play
in an indoor soccer league or
on off-season, non-high
school teams.
The goal of the proposal is
to encourage athletes to par-
ticipate in more than one
sport.
"In high school, the em-
phasis should be on par-
ticipation, not specializa-
tion," said John Johnson,
communications director of
the MHSAA.

But parents, students and
some athletic directors are
opposed to the proposal, say-
ing that it is a power grab by
administrators and would,
in the end, damage certain
sports, like soccer, volleyball
and swimming. Some have
said that it removes the
right of parents and students
to choose what sport to play
and when.
"It should be the right of
the parent or child to make
those choices," said Norm
Quinn, athletic director for
Andover and Lahser High
Schools. Mr. Quinn added
that philosophically, he
wants students to get in-
volved in more than one
sport.
Even Mr. Johnson of the
MHSAA admitted that the
proposal would be difficult to
enforce and could invite
some lawsuits.

But, he said, the proposal
addresses some problems in
high school athletics.
"There is pressure from
school coaches to specialize,"
Mr. Johnson said. "Some
kids feel forced to spe-
cialize."
Still, Kurt Keener,
athletic director of Detroit
Country Day School, called
the proposal "not right."
"This rule would be an im-
pingement on the basic
freedoms of our students and
their families," said Mr.
Keener.
The representative council
that will vote on the pro-
posal is a part-elected, part-
appointed body of 19 athletic
administrators. Locally,
Class A and B high schools
are represented by Eric Fed-
erico, Trenton High School's
athletic director. ❑

Sara's Restaurant
In Financial Straits

NOAM M.M. NEUSNER

Staff Writer

ara's, Michigan's only
full-service kosher
restaurant, is heavily
in debt and is in danger of
closing after five years of
business.
"We've been in trouble
ever since we've been in
business," said Morris
Goodman, owner of Sara's.
Mr. Goodman said the res-
taurant is about $100,000 in
debt, and that the recession
has only worsened the situa-
tion. If the current pace of

business continues, Mr.
Goodman said Sara's would
close in a year. The restau-
rant is located at 10 Mile
Road and Greenfield in
Southfield.
. "When the economy turns
bad, the first thing people
cut back on is luxuries, like
eating out," he said.
Sara's, if it fails, will join a
growing list of closed Detroit
eateries. While many of the
failures are in downtown
Detroit, Edward Deeb, pres-
ident of the Michigan Food
and Beverage Association,
said that specialty restau-

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