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November 22, 1991 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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34 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1991

THE JEWISH NEWS






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acknowledgement of its
right to exist in peace?
In addition to strategic
concerns, Israel itself has
powerful historical and legal
claims to the territories, but
these are discounted, lost
beneath the welter of
calumnies that are heaped
on the "intransigent Zionist
entity." Instead, Israel is
perceived and portrayed as a
mad, voracious beast em-
barked on an insatiable
quest for territory at any
price.
Israel has made mistakes,
the latest of which was its
ill-judged and ill-timed re-
quest for U.S. loan guar-
antees. It is an error that of-
ficials are now desperately
seeking to repair as they
claw back Israel's credibility
and credit-worthiness at
Western banks, which have
become nervous that Israel's
closest friend is hesitating to
guarantee its loans.
Such mistakes — the list is
long — are a matter of record
and of regret. The fault is
deep and systemic and it
must be corrected even if
such correction involves the
sort of root-and-branch
trauma that recently con-
vulsed the states of Eastern
Europe. If Israel will not
discipline itself, discipline

will be imposed by others,
painful and humiliating
though the experience will
be.
Israel's faults are also its
weaknesses, but it would be
a fateful tragedy if they were
to be exploited as a tool to
pressure the Jewish state
and force it to take unaccep-
table risks with its security
and with the lives of its
citizens.
Israel should draw conclu-
sions from its recent experi-

Israel cannot afford
to capitulate to
international
pressure.

ences: It should reconsider
its economic dependence on
Washington and it should
give serious consideration to
the future shape of its
borders.
These decisions, however,
must be based on a
pragmatic assessment of
strategic and security
realities, not on the dictates
of a hostile world or on an
increasingly imperialist,
impatient Washington,
whose future interests may
not closely parallel those of
the Jewish state as they did
in the past. 111

N

NEWS)

British Rallies
Protest Neo-Nazis

London (JTA) —
Thousands of anti-fascists,
including many members of
Jewish youth groups, rallied
all over Britain this week to
protest rising neo-Nazi and
extreme right-wing violence
in Europe, particularly in
Germany a year after its
unification.
The largest anti-fascist
demonstration since the
1970s took place last week in
London's East End, a neigh-
borhood that is a traditional
starting point for immigrant
groups. Over 3,500 people
protested racist attacks in a
march that began with the
burning of a swastika flag.
The demonstrations
followed similar rallies held
in Germany against neo-
Nazi attacks. Those marches
were timed to coincide with
the 53rd anniversary of
Kristallnacht and the second
anniversary of the destruc-
tion of the Berlin Wall.
Likewise, a vigil was held
in London outside the Ger-
man Embassy to mark the
anniversary of Kristalinacht,
the first organized pogrom in

the Third Reich.
One speaker at that rally,
Andrea Muller of the Berlin-
based Anti-Racist Initiative,
told the some 300 people
gathered that Germany's
neo-Nazi gangs are now out
of control. She said pro-Nazi
sentiment was rampant in
rural areas and warned that
neo- Nazis were buying arms
from Soviet troops.
Elsewhere, some 600
pickets, at least half from
the Union of Jewish
Students, formed a human
wall around Clifford's Tower
in York, where in 1190 the
Jews of the town were
massacred.
The Jewish picketers were
there to prevent a demon-
stration by the anti-Semitic
British National Party,
which has tried to hold
meetings at the site in re-
cent years.
Meanwhile, an ad hoc
committee of anti-fascists
was set up to oppose the visit
of Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader
of the extreme right-wing
French National Front.

N

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N

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