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November 15, 1991 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

"Great suit. Did you
come into money?"

"No. I went
into Van Dykes."

YOU DON'T HAVE TO COME INTO MONEY
TO DRESS LIKE YOU DID.
YOU JUST HAVE TO COME INTO THE NEW VAN DYKES.

18211 10 MILE RD. JUST W. OF SOUTHFIELD RD.

MON.-FRI. 10-9 • SAT. 10-7 • 569-4630

HUGO BOSS • ANDREW FEZZA • CANALI • V 2 BY VERSACE

Speaking for Themselves

Interviews with
25 young Israelis,
including Druze,
converted
Catholics, pious
Jews and atheists,
form a unique and
poignant portrait
of a land in crisis.

Translated by
Jean Steinberg
Pantheon Books
$19.00
At Borders $17.10

BORDERS BOOK SHOP

Novi Town Center • 347-0780
Also in Ann Arbor and Birmingham

44

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1991

La•rg Paul makes

FURNITURE
NEW.

Custom Restoration,
Lacquering,
Refinishing of new
or old furniture,
antiques, office
furniture, pianos.

For Free
Estimates

681-8280

Israel Continues
Shelling Lebanon

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Guer-
rilla warfare of increasing
intensity in southern Leb-
anon has drawn a strong
military response from
Israel and stern warning of
massive reprisals from its
commanding general in the
region.
The Israeli air force has
been pounding Shi'ite
villages north of the
southern Lebanon security
zone for more than a week,
assisted by the allied South
Lebanon Army.
It was reported that Israel
had ceased shelling posi-
tions, possibly because of
pressure from the United
States, after Washington
expressed concern such ac-
tivity could derail the Mid-
dle East peace conference in
Madrid.
But according to the
United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon, about 40
shells were fired into the
Tubeh area of southern Leb-
anon last week.
The targets are villages
suspected of supporting
guerrillas of Hezbollah, or
the Party of God. But a
Beirut newspaper reported
that most Hezbollah
militiamen left the area
eight days ago for the safety
of Beirut or the Syrian-
controlled Bekaa Valley in
eastern Lebanon.
Maj. Gen. Yitzhak
Mordechai, the Israel
Defense Force commander in
the northern region, said
that Israeli forces would
take more severe measures
to curb attacks and infiltra-
tion attempts by Hezbollah
and other radical groups.
Maj. Mordechai, touring
the hostile area with a group
of reporters, said the recent
air raids and artillery bom-
bardments represent only a
fraction of the IDF's
capabilities.
"I recommend that Hez-
bollah and those around it
keep away and keep the
peace," he said. "I recom-
mend that Lebanese living
outside the (security) zone
ensure peace and quiet in
the zone and along our
borders."
The cost of protecting the
border area has been heavy.
There have been 100 in-
cidents inside the security
zone since the beginning of
the year, reporters were told.
Half of them involved road-
side bombs which Hezbollah
boasted it planted.
Nine IDF soldiers and 12
SLA militiamen have been
killed and 30 SLA men

wounded. Most of the
fatalities were caused by the
concealed explosives trig-
gered by the victims or
detonated by remote control.
The explosive charges are
planted along roads used by
the IDF or SLA. About 33
out of 50 were sophisticated
radio- controlled devices.
But a Beirut newspaper
said the guerrillas were
resorting to the "old-
fashioned" tripwire type
since the IDF developed
electronic methods to
neutralize the radio-
controlled bombs.
Nevertheless, reporters
touring the region under
tight military protection
were impressed by the cau-
tion taken. No vehicle mov-
ed along a road that had not
first been checked by foot
soldiers.
Meanwhile, Housing Min-
ister Ariel Sharon, an
outspoken Likud hawk, urg-
ed that Israel reoccupy
southern Lebanon up to the
Litani River, as it first did in
1978.
Mr. Sharon, who as
defense minister at the time
was architect of the 1982
Israeli invasion of Lebanon,
told reporters the security
zone should be expanded to
the Litani so that the IDF
could attack terrorist bases
further north.
Meanwhile, Maj. Gen. An-
toine Lehad, commander of
the SLA, which is trained,
equipped and funded by
Israel, said the bilateral
peace talks between Israel
and Lebanon would have no
effect on his largely Chris-
tian militia or the security
zone it patrols.
Speaking at his head-
quarters in Marjayoun, the
center of a Lebanese Chris-
tian enclave just outside the
security zone, Lehad said
neither the zone nor the SLA
would be dismantled.
He said Israel would not
comply with U.N. Security
Council Resolution 425,
which requires it to quit
Lebanese soil entirely, until
the Beirut government and
its regular army proves
capable of clearing the
southern region of terrorists.
Up to now, the Lebanese
regulars have disarmed the
Shi'ite Amal militia but not
the radical Hezbollah.
The Italian newspaper
Corriere della Sera reported
that terrorist organizations
are training recruits for
hang- glider attacks on
targets in Israel and
moderate Arab countries.

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