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October 11, 1991 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

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push of a button.

20800 Southfield Rd. , Southfield, A\I I 48075

N

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(Expires '10/31/91)

Interest rates as of 10-2-91

• Decks

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Manufacturers
Comerica
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First of America

• Brick

4.90
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20

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1991

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NCJW

Continued from Page 18

Detroit," Mrs. Coden said.
"It started in St. Louis. This
is the way we work — one
city learns from the other."
Mrs. Bronk said commit-
ment is what continues to
attract young women today.
She said NCJW has the road
map to guide Jewish women
into the 21st century.
"By getting involved in
issues of pro-choice," she
said, "by making sure that
minors have that choice, by
opposing Supreme Court
nominees like Clarence
Thomas, we can realize our
vision of America. NCJW is
a chance to be on the cutting
edge of family issues. Today,
we are the major force for
choice in the Jewish com-
munity."
Mrs. Bronk, who testified
against David Souter at his
Supreme Court confirma-
tion hearings, is defiantly
opposed to Mr. Thomas.
"He doesn't stand up for
the rights of the elderly,"
Mrs. Bronk said. "He
wouldn't speak on the issue
of choice, and he gave no
clear vision of what he is
thinking."
Mrs. Bronk says the
responsibility to speak is ab-

solute. "You have to work
with state legislators, you
have to protect your rights
state by state," she said. "It
all has to do with the dem-
ocratic process. Do you
always prevail? Maybe not,
but we will always be
heard."
To this end, NCJW adopts
yearly resolutions at its con-
ventions.
"We believe what we do is
based on Jewish teachings,"
Mrs. Bronk said. "When I
travel, I am constantly
taking suggestions, up-
dating and elaborating na-
tional resolutions."
Some recently adopted
resolutions have to do with
economic policy: single
minimum wage standards
and protection of youth in
the work force; energy, con-
servation and the envi-
ronment: safe transportation
and removal of toxic waste;
and Israel: maintaining
Israel's safe and secure
borders.
"When advocacy gets in
your blood, it's impossible to
think you'll keep away from
it," Mrs. Bronk said. "I can't
imagine ever being too far
away from it." ❑

Study Suggests Home
Cut Administrative Slots

KIMBERLY LIFTON

Staff Writer

S

ubstantial cuts in ad-
ministrative costs
would help the Jewish
Home for Aged improve its
financial posture, according
to recommendations from a
Federation-mandated study.
Currently, the 312-bed
Home for Aged, which com-
prises 212 beds at Borman
Hall in Detroit and 100 beds
at Prentis Manor in
Southfield, employs 33.5
people at the administrative
level.
"There is a possibility that
we could increase employ-
ment by bringing more peo-
ple into the delivery of pa-
tient care and less ad-
ministration," Federation
President Mark Schlussel
said. "The only place to save
without impeding patient
care is in administration.
Neither the Federation nor
the Home intend to diminish
patient care."
Federation sources, who
requested anonymity, said
the Home spends con-
siderably more on ad-
ministration than other
agencies, and sources said
the Home needs to reshape
its priorities to focus on im-
proved patient care.

At the behest of the Fed-
eration, a consulting team
from the Coopers and
Lybrand accounting firm
last summer launched a
study of the Home's finan-
cial management and its
day-to-day operations. Ap-
pointed by Federation to
lead the team was Jerome
Halperin, who is employed
by Coopers and Lybrand.
The Federation stepped
into the situation in July
after questions arose over
supplemental allocations to
the Home totalling $4 mill-
ion in the past five years.
The Federation wanted to
know how JHA put the
money to use.

Six weeks after the Fed-
eration launched the study,
Home administrator Alan
Funk resigned. Federation
officials have said repeated-
ly they do not allege any
wrongdoing at JHA.
"We are trying to evaluate
the situation at Borman and
Prentis," Mr. Schlussel said.
"We have made specific sug-
gestions to improve opera-
tions."
According to Home Presi-
dent Jack Schon and Mr.
Schlussel, consultants sug-
gested redirecting the
Home's emphasis toward the
psycho-social needs of pa-

N

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