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September 06, 1991 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1991

Nabisco Dinah Shore Invita-
tional.
After nine more titles from
1984 through 1987, Ms.
Alcott once again made his-
tory at the 1988 Nabisco
Dinah Shore Invitational.
By winning the Shore event,
her $80,000 first-place prize
enabled her to become only
the third LPGA golfer to
surpass the $2 million mark
in career earnings.
"It (the Shore invitational)
was an event that I'll never
forget," Ms. Alcott recalled.
"The moment I won, I was so
happy that I jumped in a
nearby lake and took my
caddy in with me."
Perhaps as a result of her
success in golf, Ms. Alcott is
relaxed and is involved with
unusual activities off the
circuit.
She spends part of her off-
time as a short order cook at
the Butterfly Bakery in Los
Angeles where she said "the
pressure of getting an order
right is greater than sinking
a putt."
More seriously, Ms. Alcott
is involved in multiple
charities and has her own
annual charity golf tourna-
ment, the Amy Alcott Pro-
Am for MS, to benefit the
Multiple Sclerosis Society.
She also serves on the Presi-
dent's Council Against Drug
Abuse and has made a
$50,000 endowment to the
UCLA Women's Athletic
Department, which will es-
tablish golf scholarships to
female collegiate golfers.
She has been honored by
Jewish communities

throughout North America
with life memberships at
many Jewish country clubs.
She was presented with the

Canadian Jewish News

World Outstanding Jewish
Athlete award in 1983.
"I want to thank everyone
for making me feel proud as
a Jew," she said at the pre-
sentation in Montreal. "I
hope that I can inspire
other Jewish women to
become golfers. With the
support and inspiration that
I get from the Jewish com-
munity, I can play golf until
I'm 90."
Ms. Alcott's savvy at the
golf tee has made her a
sought after name to design
golf courses. Thus far, she
has been a consultant for
golf courses in Kauai,
Hawaii; Virginia, Kentucky
and California. She is also
working on an instructional
golf video.
If there is any deterrent to
future victories, it may be
her past.
"She is definitely not con-
centrating as much on her
game as she should," said
Mr. Keller, her coach. "She
may be a victim of her own
success. She is still capable
of doing great things despite
the fact that she's 35. I'm
confident that by working
hard, my little race horse
will come back strong."
And Ms. Alcott believes
she can again play her best.
"Once I get myself into a
position of challenging for a
title," she said, "I'm capable
of performing as well as in
the past." El

Court Upholds
Jail Sentences

(313) 373.9200, 24 hrs., 7 days

64



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HOSPITAL

• Immediate Assessments

Last Green

Continued from preceding page

Come and see our new, exciting line of 1992 models!

ANDY
ANDERSON'S

SPORTS

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Israel's
High Court of Justice has
upheld six-month prison
sentences meted out to two
investigators of the Shin Bet
domestic security agency
who were convicted of neg-
ligently causing the death of
a Palestinian from the Gaza
Strip.
The judgment marks the
first time Shin Bet in-
vestigators haVe been sent to
prison for mistreatment of
Palestinians under deten-
tion.
The investigators, who
were suspended from their
jobs, had appealed their
sentences and requested
that they be allowed to do
community service rather
than go to jail.
But Justice Aharon Barak
rejected the petition, writing
that "only a jail term — not

community service — can
express Israeli society's
repugnance at their deeds.
Only thus can we deter
others from doing likewise.
"Society's message to in-
vestigators is unequivocal,"
the judge wrote. "An in-
vestigation must be con-
ducted within the bounds of
law, and if it is not, the re-
sponse will be meaningful
punishment."
According to the indict-
ment, Shin Bet detained
Khaled Sheikh Ali, 27, for
questioning as a suspected
member of Islamic Jihad and
on suspicion of possessing
weapons.
During the course of the
interrogation in a Gaza jail
cell, the two Shin Bet agents
beat him severely, causing
severe bodily injuries from
which he died.

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