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August 30, 1991 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I INSIDE WASHINGTON ININaulmm.

T oday,

Franklin.
Tomorrow,
Wimbledon.

Black-Jewish Relations
Manual Almost Ready

It is soon to be issued by the Religious

Action Center of Reform Judaism.

JAMES D. BESSER

Washington Correspondent

Franklin's Junior Tennis Program

is open to members and non-members alike. Geared to those
between the ages of 3 and 18, instruction is provided on an
individual basis at all levels. Sessions fill up rapidly, so call
and register today or stop by at 29350 Northwestern, just
west of Franklin Road in Southfield.

Fall Session Begins
September 9th

Common Road to Justice:
A Programming Manual for
Blacks and Jews is a product

of the Marjorie Kovler In-
stitute for Black-Jewish Re-
lations of the Religious Ac-
tion Center of Reform
Judaism.
"The book is intended for
churches and synagogues to
promote programming bet-
ween the two kinds of in-
stitutions," said Rabbi
Lynne Landsberg, RAC's as-
sociate director. "It's a user-
friendly manual that seeks
to encourage replication of
successful programs."
The book is filled with ex-
amples of successful pro-
grams that bring together
Reform synagogues and
black churches.
An example is a program

To register, or for more information, call: 352-8000

Ext. 38.

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40

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1991

L

ast week's violence in
Brooklyn was a grim
reminder of the
volatility of black-Jewish re-
lations. So it was an accident
of good timing that a new
and comprehensive manual
on black-Jewish relations is
about to hit the presses.

in New Jersey, in which
blacks and Jews joined
forces to purchase and
rehabilitate low-income
housing. To raise money for
the project, the Jewish and
Christian participants stag-
ed a musical.
The manual has been in
the works for more than two
years. In the process, the au-
thors canvassed thousands
of churches and synagogues
to find programs that work-
ed in the real world.
The black-Jewish manual
has special relevance as
some communities hover on
the edge of black-Jewish
violence.
"It's this kind of pro-
gramming that could, on
some level, have averted the
tragedy in Brooklyn," Rabbi
Landsberg said. "It's not a
panacea. But it's definitely a
positive first step when
blacks and Jews stop
shouting at each other and
begin listening.
"We have to roll up our
shirtsleeves and start work-
ing together to better our
larger community," the
rabbi said. "Then we can see
each other as individuals, as
people worthy of respect."

When Russian Republic
President Boris Yeltsin and
his supporters faced down
the Soviet army last week,
some of their determination
to see democracy flourish
may have been related to the
training in democratic tech-
niques they received from a
group of American political
consultants.
And more than half of that
group consisted of young
Jewish activists.
"We trained more than
700 members of Mr.
Yeltsin's group," said Jen-
nifer Laszlo, political train-
ing director for Campaigns
and Elections magazines.
"And we think that the
training had an impact on
what happened in Moscow
last week."
The project began when
the leaders of Mr. Yeltsin's
movement asked ad-
ministration officials for as-
sistance in learning the
basics of democracy.
"The State Department

said it would be in this coun-
try's best interests, but that
politically they couldn't
support it," Ms. Laszlo said.
Mr. Yeltsin's group then
turned to the political com-
munity.
Campaigns and Elections
publisher Scott Berkowitz
put together a group of 35
political consultants and
assembled about $150,000 in
private donations to pay for
the project.
The consultants paid their
own expenses, and put up
with some privation — in-
cluding icy hotel rooms in
the twenty-below-zero
November weather, the
result of retaliation by Com-
munist hard-liners.
Initially, Ms. Laszlo said,
the Soviet politicians had
grand visions of doing
American-style television
commercials for their can-
didates.
"Part of our job was to go
over there and try to deter-
mine what was realistic,

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