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July 12, 1991 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

John
Long

*')\") SPEND A SUPER
SUMMER WITH US
"
0§\
<<s

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ALL AGES/ALL LEVELS/NON-MEMBERS WELCOME

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• Limited Space

• All Day and
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• Swimming, Basketball,
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Opening of Her New Salon . .

you

FULL SERVICE SALON

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JOINING OUR STAFF IS LENA, REGISTERED ELECTROLOGIST

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Special Occasion Appointments also Available.
We Specialize in Bridal Parties.

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28

FRIDAY JULY 12, 1991

20 Years Of Marriage
Lead Couple To Chuppah

AMY J. MEHLER

Staff Writer

Camps start weekly
beginning June 17.

IMAq_„3 Of

Adel and Ilya Kozadayev the day of their wedding.

lya and Adel Kozadayev
exchanged wedding vows
more than 20 years ago
during a secular Soviet
ceremony in Leningrad.
But last month, just two
days before their youngest
son's bar mitzvah, Ilya and
Adel married again — only
this time the couple stood
beneath a chupah, among
relatives, friends, rabbis and
witnesses.
"I felt like I married my-
fiance of 20 years," said Mr.
Kozadayev, the father of
three children.
"We wanted everything to
be kosher hi our new lives,"
Mrs. Kozadayev said. "I
wanted our union to be
kosher under a real
chupah."
The family, which left Len-
ingrad a year-and-a-half ago,
has no regrets about embrac-
ing their religion.
"No one in the Soviet
Union can feel or be re-
ligious," Mr. Kozadayev,
said. "Anything that related
to Judaism was outlawed.
We always wanted to be
more religious. We felt
something Jewish in our
soul."
Mrs. Kozadayov, who
covers her hair according to
Jewish tradition, said her
•parents, who live in Oak
Park, tried hard to be Jewish
in the Soviet Union.
"As a small girl, I re-
member my parents telling
me about being Jewish,"
Mrs. Kozadayev said. "My
father went to a cheder and
learned Hebrew and
Yiddish. But the cheder was
closed, and he had to keep
what. he learned a secret."
Today, the Kozadayevs

and their children learn as
much Hebrew and Torah as
they want and as much as
the school day allows.
Stanislav, 13, who adopted
Levi as his Hebrew name, is
in the seventh grade at the
Yeshiva Beth Yehudah. His
sister, Veronica, 6, or
Rachel, who speaks English
like a native, attends the
Sally Allan Alexander Beth
Jacob School for Girls.
Vitali, 23, or Reuven, who
is studying business at
Wayne State University,
spent several weeks learn-
ing at the Yeshivat Ohr
Sameach in Jerusalem last
summer.
Last year, the Kozadayev
men took a different step.
They each agreed to undergo
a brit milah, a ritual Jewish
circumcision.
Mr. Kozadayev, a profes-
sional pianist turned
salesman, said there aren't
many SoViet Jews who are
ready or willing to take that
kind of step.
"The main feeling of
Soviet people is fear," Mr.
Kozadayev said. "When
you've lived under this kind
of pressure all your life, it's
hard to come out of it."
Mrs. Kozadayev agreed,
saying Soviet Jews have
been deceived all their lives.
"You're taught that re-
ligion is a bad thing in the
Soviet Union," she said.
"Everything about Soviet
culture is against religion.
Work is taught to be the
most important thing in
your life. If a woman stays at
home with children, she is
looked on as a shame."
Vitali, who was a flutist
with a symphony orchestra
in Leningrad, said his family
was always different. - •
"I probably wanted to

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