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July 05, 1991 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-07-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

JEWISH EDUCATION

1991-92

Agency for Jewish Education
Akiva Hebrew Day School
Hillel Day School
Transportation Service
Yeshiva Beth Yehudah
Yeshiva Gedolah

$

916,380
197,000
273,000
19,000
267,000
25,000

COMMUNITY SERVICES

Hebrew Free Loan Association
Jewish Family Service
Jewish Federation Apartments
Jewish Home for Aged
Jewish House of Shelter
Jewish Information Service
Jewish Vocational Service
Resettlement Service
Resettlement Reserve
Sinai Hospital

55,000
1,193,725
25,427
950,794
1,550
45,000
729,453
278,700

150,000

CULTURE AND GROUP SERVICES

B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
Fresh Air Society
Hillel Foundation -
Metro Detroit/WSU
Hillel Foundation - MSU
Hillel Foundation - U of M
Jewish Community Center
Jewish Community Council

CAPITAL NEEDS

Various Agencies

CENTRAL SERVICES

Jewish Welfare Federation
National Dues (CJF, LCBC, etc.)

OVERSEAS

United Jewish Appeal
America-Israel Cultural Foundation
HIAS
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

NATIONAL AGENCIES

American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith
Association of Jewish Family
and Children's Agencies
Baltimore Institute for Jewish
Communal Service
B'nai B'rith National Youth
Services (Hillel)
Brandeis University Hornstein
Program in Jewish
Communal Service
Center for Jewish Studies
Hebrew Union College School
of Jewish Communal Service.
Jewish Community Centers
Association of North America
(formerly JWB)
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish War Veterans
National Association of Jewish
Vocational Services
National Jewish Center for
Learning and
Leadership (CLAL)
National Tay-Sachs Association
North American Jewish
Students Appeal
Project Interchange
Synagogue Council of America
*Joint Budgeting Council

1990-91

$

920,500
183,710
262,825
20,165
230,345
18,000

45,000
1,085,500
36,427
980,200
1,550
42,000
968,625
275,624
124,980
150,000

25,000
464,550

12,100
504,000

73,600
90,500
156,450
1,295,500
532,000

68,600
78,000
138,880
1,280,500
532,000

542,267

572,494

593,750
175,775

625,000
167,550

14,271,552
12,500
89,700
48,500

14,562,300
13,950
89,700
53,940

75,690
54,450

84,100
60,500

75,690

84,100

2,800

2,800

1,600

1,600

46,500

46,500

900
2200

900
2200

1,600

1,600

56,880
29,340
6,000

63,200
32,600
12,000

7,200

7,200

3,000
900

3,000
900

3,400
900
2,800
230,977

3,400
900
2,800
230,975

(Jewish Education Service of North America, National Conference on Soviet Jewry,
National Foundation for Jewish Culture, National Jewish Community Relations Ad-
visory Council)
*The Joint Budgeting Council comingles the funds it receives from Detroit and ten
other communities. JBC allocates to the four agencies listed.

14

FRIDAY, JULY 5, 1991

A New Name And A New Budget
For Jewish Welfare Federation

PHIL JACOBS

Managing Editor

A

new name and a new
budget all in one
week.
That's what faced officers
and professionals of
Detroit's Federation this
week as it made plans for the
short and long term.
The Federation joined a
growing list of like organiza-
tions across the country
when it dropped the word
"welfare" from its Jewish
Welfare Federation title,
renaming it instead the
Jewish Federation of Metro-
politan Detroit.
Nationally, the word
"welfare" was seen as a
questionable part of the
title. Federation President
Mark Schlussel said the
name, in effect since 1926,
needed to be changed to
better reflect changes that
Federation had undergone
over the years.
"During the Depression,
Federation activity focused
on welfare in its broad sense,
but in a pretty narrow
geographical area," he said.
"We continue to provide ser-
vices to those who are in fi-
nancial need, and our new
mission statement will
reflect that. But Federa-
tion's agenda is much
broader now. We seek to im-
prove the quality of Jewish
life, and we are reaching out
to a much more diverse
population that is spread
throughout the Detroit
metropolitan area."
But it wasn't the Depres-
sion that concerned the Fed-
eration leaders in the plann-
ing of the fiscal 1991-92
budget. Instead it was the
recession and how to
prioritize a budget with a 5
percent cutback in available
Allied Jewish Campaign
funds. Last year's available
allocation was $24,420,850,
compared to this year's
$23,917,500 or a cutback of
about a half million dollars.
About 60 percent of those
funds or about $14.5 million
went to overseas and needs
in Israel, with $9.5 million
staying home for local pro-
grams. Federation was able
to use monies from an un-
tapped prior-year reserve to
shift some funds into local
programs as well.
The real bottom line, ac-
cording to Federation Ex-
ecutive Vice President
Robert Aronson, was even

with the recession and Rus-
sian resettlement, funds for
most domestic services were
maintained on an even keel.
Mr. Aronson said that for
the first time, Federation
used priority budgeting. In-
stead of giving across-the-
board increases or status quo
funding, Federation looked
at what it had and made
hard decisions accordingly.
It divided its funds accor-
ding to several priorities
that included populations at
risk, such as new Americans,
and it looked at previously
established community
priorities such as the disabl-
ed, transportation and other
areas.
Mr. Aronson said priority
budgeting is a portent for
the future of Federation
budgeting. It wasn't a hand-
ful of years ago that issues
such as Project Exodus, local
Soviet resettlement and
even recession were not fac-
tors to be considered. There
is also, he said, much more
competition for Federation
dollars coming from other
fund-raising areas.
Jewish Family Service Ex-
ecutive Director Alan
Goodman, whose agency

received an increase in fun-
ding, praised the priority
process. He said that at first
he worried every agency
would be cut back. Agencies,
he added, were told to go
back to their drawing boards
and demonstrate what the
urgencies and - needs of their
departments really were.
"Listen, I think it's a while
until we are out of the
woods," Mr. Goodman said.
"I'm still concerned about
general assistance from the
state being cut back because
the Jewish community
doesn't have the resources to
take the government's place.
But given the restraints on
the Federation, I feel good
about what they did in rela-
tion to the budget."
Mr. Schlussel said consti-
tuent agencies were first
asked by Federation to come
up with significant cutbacks.
Instead, they educated the
Federation, showing it just
where they felt cuts could be
made.
"It's a credit to the agen-
cies that they prioritized
their programs based on real
need in a time of economic
constraints," Mr. Schlussel
said.



Photos by G lenn Triest

Campaign Allocations

Skid marks lead up to the Kollel.

Car Rams Into Kollel

AMY J. MEHLER

Staff Writer

A

t 8:40 a.m. June 25, a

small grey Dodge
ripped past Leah
Irons' home and plowed into
the porch railing of the
Kollel next door. Had two of

her sons been on their way to
school, they might have been
caught in the- path of the
careening car, she said.
Olga Grace Mogel, 82, and
her neighbor, Bertha Green,
72, were backing out of their
parking space at Lincoln
Towers, according to Officer
Tracy Guibord, one of two

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