100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 28, 1991 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPORTS

Compare the rest
we're still the best!

Interest rates as of 6-19-91

MONEY MARKET RATES

anklin

MIKE ROSENBAUM

Special to The Jewish News

5.40

Manufacturers

5.30

Comerica

5.30

Michigan National

4.90

Standard Federal

5.10

First Federal of Michigan

5.10

First of America

5.00

A

..

.Based on 510,000 deposit. Some minimum deposit requirements may be lower.
Higher rates may be available for larger deposits.

ONE YEAR CERTIFICATE

:::: fi e

ttm Ann

a

6.40% 6.59%

$10,000 minimum balance. Higher rates available for longer terms.

Franklin

SAVINGS

Bank

LENDER

For information, call 358-5170

Southfield • Birmingham Grosse Pointe Woods

STATE FARM INSURANCE

MARILYN J. GOLD-AGENCY

"I believe in personalized service"
• AUTO • HEALTH
• HOME • COMMERCIAL
• LIFE • IRAs • BUSINESS

STATE FARM

WOO

INSURANCE,

353-1400

26561 W. 12 Mile Road, Suite 203, Southfield, MI 48034

YOUR EXERCISE CONNECTION

.

• TREADMILLS Electric/Manual
• STAIR CLIMBERS
• HEALTH BIKES
Manual/Dual Action/Electric
• ROWING MACHINES
• MISC. GYM EQUIPMENT

(ALL ITEMS DISCOUNTED)

LARRY ARONOFF

ACTON RENTAL & SALES

891.6500

540.5550

The only name you need to know for
insurance work ♦ restoration ♦ unibody repair

737-7122

32581 Northwestern Highway
Farmington Hills, M148108

50

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1991

s a car owner, Kenny
Bernstein has a hand
in North America's
two most popular forms of
auto racing: Indy cars and
NASCAR, stock cars. But driv-
ing his own drag racers still
gives Bernstein his greatest
success, and greatest
enjoyment.
"Driving has always come
first for me," says Bernstein,
who was in town for the
Detroit Grand Prix.
"If everything else went
away," Bernstein continues,
"we would still do the drag
racing because I still enjoy
that very much."
Bernstein's King Racing
team owns driver Brett
Bodine's NASCAR stock car,
an Indy car which Roberto
Guerrero drove to 15th place
in Detroit on June 16, and
Bernstein's own Top Fuel
dragster.
How does the 46-year-old
Bernstein oversee all three
teams while remaining an ac-
tive driver? "I've got a lot of
good people around me and
with me that make it hap-
pen," he explains. "It never
will and never has affected
my personal goals of racing in
Top Fuel and drag racing
with the Budweiser King.
That's what I love to do
because I get to be the driver
and I enjoy that very much.
We hope we just do a great job
across the board with
everything and make it
right."
As a driver, Bernstein won
his first world Funny Car
championship in 1979, then
dominated drag racing in the
80s. In 1981 he became the
only driver to win races and
establish national records on
all three major drag racing
circuits (NHRA, IHRA and
AHRA) in the same season.
Bernstein won the NHRA
Nationals and the Big Bud
Shootout on the same
weekend in 1983, earning
$80,000 — the biggest payout
in drag racing history to that
point.
Bernstein won the first of
four straight NHRA World
Funny Car championships in
1985. He was the first Funny
Car driver to break the 260-
and 270-mile per hour
barriers.
Bernstein switched from
Funny Cars to Top Fuel
dragsters last season. He
describes the cars as similar
although, "the Top Fuel car is

Photo by Mike Rose n baum

............. ...

National Bank of Detroit

FDIC
Insured

Drag Racer Bernstein
Puts His Driving First

Kenny Bernstein both owns and drives drag racers.

a little easier to drive because
of the wheel base," he says.
Through seven of this season's
18 races, Bernstein had two
victories and was second in
the Top Fuel standings:
Geography had a lot to do
with Bernstein's involvement
in drag racing. "I grew up in
west Texas," he says, "in the
days when cars were very im-
portant — the late 50s, early
60s. The cars were a way of
life and I just grew up doing
drag racing because that's
what there was to do there.
And I really loved it and fell
in love with it and just never
got out of it. Because it was
the one thing that was
available for me in west
Texas, that's probably why I
stuck with drag racing. If I
grew up in Charlotte, North
Carolina, it would've pro-
bably been stock cars."
Bernstein says a drag racer
needs the same skills as an
oval track racer or a street
course driver. "A tremendous
amount of concentration
ability, reaction and reflexes
are all key to any race driver,"
he says. "Those things have to
be there for anyone to be a
driver of any type, whether it
be drag racing or Indy car,
NASCAR or IMSA. If you
have those, the next step is, do
you have the ability to be ag-
gressive, do you have the
ability to think on your feet
and to use good judgment?
And that comes with ex-
perience and time."
A drag racer's run is very
short, typically about six
seconds or less, but the car ac-
celerates to around 300 miles
per hour in that time. Drag
racing, Bernstein says,
demands 100 percent concen-

tration. "All that's going
through my mind is what's
taking place with the race car
and what it's telling me to do,
to control and drive the race
car. If I've got anything else
on my mind I'm super-human
because believe me (the car)
will get your attention."
Bernstein's goal is to win
the Ibp Fuel championship
and become the first driver to
win both the Funny Car and
'Ibp Fuel titles.
The technical side of racing
is something that concerns
any driver — after all, his
health or even his life

"Cars were a way
of life, and I just
grew up doing drag
racing because
that's what there
was to do there."

— Kenny Bernstein

depends on his car's perfor-
mance. It's significant that
Bernstein trusts his
mechanics enough to let them
handle most of his cars'
technical concerns.
"I have people who take
care of that, that's their
department, that's what
they're supposed to do. We
discuss it all the time. We
discuss things that they want
to do, what they want to ac-.
complish and why, and I try
to give out my input to make
it better for them or to maybe
show them a side that they
maybe had not thought of.
But that's their duties and
they're quite capable of doing
that."

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan