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April 26, 1991 - Image 88

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Join us for
Yeshiva Gedolah's
Special Spring Lecture Event

Helping Hands

Continued from preceding page

with

RABBI AHARON FELDMAN

Author of

The Juggler and the King

who will be discussing three talmudic riddles
from his book.
Tradition tells us that these talmudic riddles
contain the keys to human life; what moti-
vates man, what constitutes success, and
how life's goals can be achieved.

RIDDLE #1 — THE JUGGLER AND THE KING

"Said Rabba bar Bar-Chanah: I saw Hormin the son
of Lillith running along the battlements of the city wall
of Mechuza. A cavalryman below, riding on an animal,
could not keep up with him.
Once two mules were saddled for (Hormin) and stood
on the two sides of the River Donag. He jumped from
one mule to the other while holding two cups of wine
in his hands, pouring from one to the other without a
drop falling to the earth.
That was the day when things "rise to the heavens
and descend to the depths" (Tehillim 107:26); finally the
King's men heard of (Hormin's doings) and put him to
death:' (Bava Basra 73a-b)

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Maple-Drake Building
DeRoy Theatre

Refreshments will be served
There will be NO SOLICITATION

R.S.V.P. Or for further information
contact Rabbi Eric Krohner at 968-3360

Joel H. Goodman

Discount Foreign Car Broker

Save now! Buy or lease the
following new imported cars:
Mercedes Benz • BMW • Infinity • Lexus
Jaguar • Porsche • Ferrari • Others

Call 313-399-9075

Global Gallery Inc.

Cara lanni discusses fingernail painting with Judson Center resident
Denise.

ing proms, Charlene tells
them she lives at Judson be-
cause she does not get along
with her parents.
Meanwhile, in another
unit, this one for boys ages
15-18, Avi Moskowitz, 17, a
Groves High School senior,
is in the kitchen making
Passover brownies with the
help of some residents. Nor-
mally, the guys go outside
and play basketball, but the
rainy weather prohibits it.
Instead, some sit around
talking, while others watch
a basketball videotape.
After nearly two hours, the
visiting students leave Jud-
son. There are no friendship
hugs, just a promise to see
each other next week and a
feeling that both groups of
teens have a better under-
standing of each other.
It was not always so.
Although only a few miles
away from the United Heb-
rew Schools building, the Jud-
son Center might as well
have been a world away for
these students.
. rig
When they started coml
to Judson, the students were
startled at the differences as
they. tried making friends
with a group of younger
children, Mrs. Rosenzveig
said. Eventually, the chil-
dren responded and the
teens felt they were needed.
Then one day, the students

,

showed up at Judson only to
discover the kids had gone to
church, she said. "Now we
were the ones who felt ne-
glected. It hurt."
Not willing to give up on
the project, Mrs. Rosenzveig
went next door to the older
boys' unit and to the girls'
home. "It was hard with a
new group of kids," she said.
"The younger kids were
more receptive."
The teens' first reactions
to their new visitors was to
ask what they were doing
there and why they -came
back, she said. "They can't
believe someone cares about
them. They're just testing
us. They can't accept that
we're here week after week.
"The girls were especially
unresponsive. It's very hard
when they've been abused
for a long time," she said.
"When my kids walked in
for the first time they
discovered this was going to
be hard. They had to push
themselves. Some girls felt
they weren't needed.
"We had to remember it's
not us," Mrs. Rosenzveig
said. But her students
sometimes forgot and made
excuses to skip class. She
reminded them they had
made a commitment to these
teens.
"We are trying to break
through and make them feel

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