100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 26, 1991 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BACKGROUND

ART OF
BROSE U LINBURG
SCULPTURES

INTRODUCING
AN ARTIST
WHO LOOKS
GOOD
ON PAPER

Bronze Steel
Stone

Paintings & Furniture

We are obliged to
move soon from our
downtown studio.

Call

965-1335

Thank You
to all my family,
friends & relatives
for all your cards,
gifts and calls
during my recent
surgery. Your
outpouring of love
and concern is
greatly appreciated.

Miriam Davis

Greg

SHOES

Mary Fisher presents her unique art form,
combining the ancient art of paper making,
with colorful abstract and realistic images.

See the exhibit, exclusively at Linda Hayman
Gallery, May 3 thru 31.

TrdriAymAN

.1.

G

A

l

L

ER

Y

32500 Northwestern Hwy., Farmington Hills, MI 48334 932-0080

ORCHARD MALL

EVERGREEN PLAZA

851-5566

559-3580

WEST BLOOMFIELD

SOUTHFIELD

FREE

Municipal
Bonds Listing

Receive Weekly Report

Edwanis& Int

1- 10,4114fSVIN

BOB MORIAN
(3 13)336-92OG 1-800-365-9200

COATS
UNLIMITED

Sterling Heights
Sterling Place
37680 Van Dyke at 16 1/2 Mile
939-0700

Oak Park
Lincoln Center, Greenfield at 10 , 4 Mile
968-2060

West Bloomfield
Orchard Mall, Orchard Lake
at Maple (15 Mile) • 855-9955

We are winning.

AMERICAN
SOClETY
CANCER.

34

FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1991

Did Israel Poke?

Continued from preceding page

say, he concluded that the
Israeli formula would never
fly and he therefore modified
his own position in order to
squeeze more concessions
out of Jerusalem and close
the conceptual and percep-
tual gaps.
There was, however, an-
other factor that may have
contributed to the steep
decline in the diplomatic
temperature between Wash-
ington and Jerusalem: a
decision by Housing Min-
ister Ariel Sharon to estab-
lish a new Jewish set-
tlement, Revava, in the
heart of the West Bank.
Mr. Baker learned of this
fresh move when he stopped
off for a meeting with Euro-
pean leaders iri Luxembourg
en route for Jerusalem.
Clenching his teeth, he
declined to comment public-
ly on the move, promising to
take up the issue directly
with the-Israelis.
At a meeting with a three-
person Palestinian delega-
tion in Jerusalem the day
after his stormy encounter
with Israeli leaders, Mr.

Baker displayed his disap-
proval by running an ABC-
TV interview with the new
settlers for the benefit of his
guests.
While the settlers boasted
that it was deeds not words
that counted, an enraged
Secretary Baker left no
doubt in the minds of the Pa-
lestinians that he regarded
Revava as a poke in the eye
for America.

With political fortunes
now balanced on a knife-
edge, the appearance of that
small cluster of prefabricated
dwellings on the West Bank
at this delicate moment in
United States diplomacy was
an act of breath-taking,
perhaps foolhardy, defiance
by Israel.

As Jerusalem seeks to con-
solidate the political credit it
accumulated during the Gulf
war and desperately casts
about for assistance in hous-
ing the flood of new Soviet
immigrants, Revava may
yet prove to be a catastrophic
error of judgment. ❑

NEWS

AT&T Shareholders Turn
Down Neo-Nazi Proposal

New York (JTA) — As ex-
pected, American Telephone
and Telegraph Co. share-
holders voted overwhelm-
ingly against a • proxy pro-
posal put forth by the Na-
tional Alliance, a neo-Nazi
hate group, that would have
required the telephone com-
pany to stop doing business
in Israel.
Fully 96 percent of the
votes came in against the
proposal, according to
reports from Chicago, where
the company's annual
shareholders meeting took
place April 17.
The National Alliance rec-
ommended that AT&T stop
doing business with Israeli-
owned companies in order to
express "moral outrage"
over what it alleged was
Israel's "ghastly record of
human rights violations
perpetrated upon the Pales-
tinian people."
The AT&T board of direc-
tors recommended voting
against the proposal, poin-
ting out that the National
Alliance's "professed con-
cern for human rights lacks
credibility, and is even
misleading, given the con-
sistent anti-Semitic bias in
the proponent's literature
and public statements."
The National Alliance
proposal received 4 percent

of the shareholders' 1.09
billion votes, just over the 3
percent required by the Se-
curities and Exchange
Commission to get the same
proposal included in next
year's AT&T proxy state-
ment.
Although the National Al-
liance's proposal was round-
ly defeated, the the neo-Nazi
group succeeded in achiev-
ing its real goal: to garner
increased credibility for its
racist views through main-
stream exposure.
For the Jewish and other
groups fighting the National
Alliance's campaign, efforts
to combat groups of this ilk-
are a double-edged sword.
A balance must be careful-
ly struck between exposing
the National Alliance's real
goals to public scrutiny and
not ceding it too much of the
publicity it so hungrily
seeks.
"We never want to give
these groups the visibility
that they don't deserve," ex-
plained Jerome Chanes, co-
director for domestic con-
cerns • at NJCRAC, the Na-
tional Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council.
"At the same time, our
long experience has taught
us that the best counterac-
tion against groups such as
National Alliance is public

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan