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April 19, 1991 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I SPORTS

BETH ABRAHAM HILLEL MOSES and
MIDRASHA-COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES

Present a Special Lag B'Omer Event

THE FIRST DETROIT GREAT JEWISH DEBATE

1

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addressing
Survival of Jewish Identity and Jewish Values

THE DEBATERS

THE QUESTIONERS

Rabbi M. Robert Syme - Temple Israel

Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper - Beth

Rabbi Louis Finkelman - Wayne State

Ofra Fisher - Executive Director,

University Hillel
Dr. Mark Smiley - Head Master,
Hillel Day School
Harlene Appelman - JEFF
(Jewish Experiences for Families)
and Jewish Welfare Federation

Agency for Jewish Education
Robert Lask - Educational Director,
Temple Beth El
Arthur Horwitz - Publisher,
"The Jewish News"

Abraham Hillel Moses

CONGREGATION BETH ABRAHAM HILLEL MOSES
5075 WEST MAPLE ROAD
WEST BLOOMFIELD

THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1991 at 7:30 P.M.

The community is invited
Admission is free

Refreshments will be served

Please call 851-6880 or 352-7117 for further information

If you really care, you will be there!

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We monitor flights for correct arrivals, early
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Limousine Service

50 FRIDAY APRIL 19. 1991

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MAPLE at CRANBROOK)
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We are winning.

i'AMERICAN

SOCIETY
CANCER'

Seattle Slew and trainer Dan Rosenberg.

Race Horse Wainer
At Home On Farm

HARLAN ABBEY

Special to The Jewish News

W

hile Fly So Free,
Dinard, Best Pal and
Meadow Star are the
favorites for this year's Ken-
tucky Derby, Dan Rosenberg
is rooting for quick improve-
ment by Compelling Sound,
General Meeting, Avenue of
Flags, Cien Fuegos or Bam-
boo Road.
Rosenberg, born in Israel,
has one of the most important
jobs in all of horse racing. He
manages Three Chimneys
Farms in Kentucky, whose
stallions include Triple
Crown champion Seattle Slew
and his son, Slew O'Gold.
Seattle Slew is the sire of
Compelling Sound, General
Meeting, Avenue of Flags and
Cien Fuegos. Slew O'Gold
sired Bamboo Road.
If any of them do well in the
Derby, Preakness, Belmont or
other top races for 3-year-olds
it can only raise the reputa-
tions of their sires, and raise
the price of their breeding
services.
While Roger Clemens may
be the highest paid athlete at
$5 million a season, that sum
could almost be called "horse
feed" at Three Chimneys.
"Seatle Slew is bred at
$200,000 per service,"
Rosenberg explained. "He's
bred to 60 mares each year, so
he earns $12 million."
And he never tries to
renegotiate his salary, either.
Rosenberg was supposed to
follow his father — now back
in Israel — into the business
world and enrolled in a com-
bination BA-MBA program at
the University of Rochester.
But the pull of riding and
training show horses caused
him to leave after a year.
After two years of riding in
California and Connecticut

he switched to race horses,
working first in Maryland,
where one of his charges was
Dancer's Image, the con-
troversial disqualified Derby
winner.
"In horse shows," he said,
"so much depends on the
judge's opinion, and I think
that opinion often is influenc-
ed by who owns or rides the
horse. In racing, style doesn't
matter. The horse under the
wire first is the winner."
While top racing trainers
like Wayne Lukas, Charlie
Wittingham, Alan Goldberg
and Robert Frankel (the last
two also Jewish), earn 10 per-
cent of their horses' winnings
and are well-known on the
sports pages, Rosenberg
prefers life on the farm.

"I think I'd enjoy the
challenge of training a horse
and developing its potential.
But the lifestyle, constantly
moving from track to track
and living out of a suitcase
. . . that's not for me," he said.

"As to how long Seattle
Slew can keep earning his
$12 million per year, that's
uncertain, too. He's 16 now
and the average stallion can
keep active until he's 20 to 22.

"I can't look at the babies
when they're born, or later
on, and pick out the future
champions. Anyone who says
he can is kidding himself.
What I can see is mechanical
ability — the way a horse
moves — or construction
defects — possible physical
problems because of the way
the horse is built.
"But what I can't see —
what no one can see — is
what's inside the horse: his
heart, his desire to win. A
good racehorse wants to win;
the trainer and jockey can't
make him run any faster
than he wants to.

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