100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

March 22, 1991 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

High Scorers

SAVE

Continued from preceding page

$6 9 138700

on a brand new 1990 Cadillac

Stk. #90603

NOW ONLY $22, 88800

LOADED W/EXTRAS!
Theft det. system,
wire wheels & rear
defogger ISC Pkg.,
custom stripes.

V

.4 140■, #!

aiaiigNMPr4Mg*

-



....................

s

dside
ervi ce

SliARTLEASE

OGER

-..\\

INKE

DILLAC

A General Motors Family Since 1917

... '

‘\■

758-1800

NISSAN NISSAN NISSAN NISSAN NISSAN

Right on the money. Right now.

Q
In

1991 MAXIMA GXE

LEASE FOR

$20000 *

per month

LEASE FOR

gni% oo *

Per month

in

2
2

`Stock #1753. Based on a 48 month closed end lease with
$1,000 down payment with approved credit. Customer is
responsible for excess wear and tear. Lease includes 60,000
miles with 15 , per mile penalty. Customer has option to pur-
chase at lease termination for $9,050. First payment, refun-
dable security deposit, down payment and plate fee due at
lease inception. Subject to use tax.

*Stock #1609. Stanza XE with automatic, air, AM/FM stereo
cassette. Based on a 36 month closed end lease with $1,000
down payment with approved credit. Customer is responsi-
ble for excess wear and tear. Lease includes 45,000 miles with
15 , per mile penalty. Customer has option to purchase at lease
termination for $7578. First payment, refundable security
deposit, down payment and plate fee due at lease inception.
Subject to use tax.

uburban

in

2
2

NISSAN

tn
in

2

2

1991 STANZA XE

2

2
2

in
1:1

Built for the Human Race®.

1800 MAPLELAWN 'TROY MOTOR MALL. 649-2300

2

2

ri

in

2

NISSAN NISSAN NISSAN NISSAN NISSAN

52

FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1991

Women for 16 years, and also
in the His and Hers mixed
league every other week for
11 years. A former physical
education teacher, Herold
bowls for the exercise and
social aspects, she says.
Herold, unlike male
bowlers who refuse to go on
record about abandoning
their spouses for an evening,
readily admits she enjoys the
"girls' night out" aspect of
the women's league.
Although she enjoys the
competition and is carrying a
healthy 161 average this
season, the 48-year-old bowler
says the social part of the ac-
tivity is what she would miss
the most if she had to give it
up tomorrow.
Pisgah's Fishman says
serious bowlers don't feel
crowded out by the social dic-
tates of the sport. "I enjoy it.
This is a good group of guys.
I'm here to work on my game,
but I have a lot of fun with it
too."
Make no mistake though,
the 29-year-old auto broker is
serious about the sport. His
attitude shows up in the wrist
brace he wears each week and
the new $125 ball he pur-
chases each year.
Fishman bowls in a second
league, the B'nai B'rith
Brotherhood League, on Mon-
day nights. In between, he
works out at a health club, in
part to help improve his bowl-
ing stamina.
Midway through the 1990-
91 season, his 207.67 average
was second in the league to
Shel Rakoltz's 214.7. He had
the league's high game (289)
and series (784).
"I've never bowled a 300
game but I'm looking forward
to it," he says, admitting he
sounds cockier than he real-
ly is. Still, he's been close and
he's witnessed a few. Fishman
clearly relishes the idea of
one day turning in that
perfect performance.
It's kind of eerie," Fishman
says. "You're excited.
Everyone stops and watches
you. The place turns
unbelievably quiet."
Fishman, who began bowl-
ing at age 8, dropped it in his
teens and only picked it up
again in his early 20s, has vi-
sions of joining the Profes-
sional Bowlers Association, or
"the tour" as bowling fans
reverently refer to it. He
needs to bowl in two regional
tournaments in order to
qualify for professional
standing.
"I really would like to turn
pro," Fishman says. "I think
I'm good enough. I could be
up in the 220s, 230s if I bowl-
ed every day like those guys."
For years he has followed
televised progress of the

PBA's reigning Jewish
bowlers, Mark Roth and Mar-
shal Holman.
Though viewers can still
catch the pros every weekend
on ABC's "Wide World of
Sports," bowling's popularity
as a participatory activity has
slowly dwindled since its hey-
day three decades ago. Bet-
ween 1955 and 1963, the
number of bowling alleys in
the United States grew from
6,000 to nearly 11,000, accor-
ding to the Bowling Centers
Association of Southeastern
Michigan (BCASM). Organiz-
ed league bowlers more than
doubled from three million to
seven million during the
same period.
Midwestern cities such as
Detroit, Milwaukee and St.
Louis became bowling hot-
beds, with Detroiters giving
the city the self-proclaimed ti-
tle of "Bowling Capital of the
World."
The B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional Bowling Association
sanctioned 22,000 leagues at
one point, a figure that has
since shrunk to 8,000, accor-
ding to longtime Pisgah
bowler Mary Dictor.
The sport's popularity fad-
ed as more sophisticated
recreational tastes were born
in the 1960s and '70s. Despite
a doubling of the U.S.
economy since 1963, the
number of bowling alleys — or
bowling centers, as they're
now called has dwindled to
something under 7,800.
It's also become expensive,
Dictor says, with even casual
bowlers spending $400-$500
to participate in a league
season.
Still, the BCASM estimates
there are 350,000 regular
bowlers in Michigan.
The Pisgah League and
other Jewish bowling leagues
in metro Detroit are rich in
history as well. Pisgah
bowlers have been tossing
balls for 52 years. At one time
the league had seven divi-
sions, Lefton recalls.
Morris Burnstein, who will
be 79 in April, was a founding
member and secretary of the
Pisgah League for 31 years.
No longer an active bowler,
Burnstein still shows up
every Thursday to monitor
the progress of his son, Joe,
and grandson, David, who
bowl on separate teams.
He's watched as bowlers
have migrated along with the
Jewish community: starting
at the Satellite Lanes on Lin-
wood and moving to the Dex-
ter Bowl-a-drome, Oak Park
Lanes, Maple Lanes in Troy
and now West Bloomfield
Lanes.
"To bowl with these guys is
almost like being a part of
history," he says. ❑

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan