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March 22, 1991 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

computers need to be
repaired, teachers have to
be paid, children's pro-
grams need new crafts.
Yet sipping a cup of her-
bal tea, Mrs. Bates-
Brackett appears anything
but flustered. Maybe be-
cause, despite the
obstacles, she loves this

Appointed last April,
Mrs. Bates-Brackett is the
local Workmen's Circle's
first director in 10 years. A
new director has just been
hired in New Jersey, and
the Workmen's Circle in
Los Angeles is looking for a
new, young leader.
Mrs. Bates-Brackett took
the job because she likes
working with groups and
because it combines her
three loves: teaching, ad-
ministration and budgeting.

She calls herself an artist
who puts ideas into action

"We want to be a
place where the
positive is
stressed, where
everyone is
accepted, where
the talents and
skills of each is
recognized."

Ellen Bates-Brackett

rather than painting on a
canvas.
Among the Workmen's
Circle programs she cites
are a food drive for Yad
Ezra, the kosher food pan-
try, and a statement sup-
porting gay rights.
"Everybody who is hurt
or downtrodden is us," she
says. "We're all affected by
that."
She is proud of the way
the organization's mem-
bers, despite the diversity
of their backgrounds and
religious leanings, work
together. This was espe-
cially true last year when
they created a Rosh
Hashanah service, lead by
the congregants at the
Workmen's Circle
building.
"It used to be a lot of our
members went elsewhere
for Rosh Hashanah," Mrs.
Bates-Brackett says. "Now
they come here."
Her plans for the organ-
ization's growth include
continued attention to the

nursery school, developing
leaders and tapping into
anyone even remotely tied
to the Workmen's Circle.
"I've heard many people
say, 'My grandfather was
in Workmen's Circle,' "
she says. "The idea is to
take that and run with it."
The building is being
redesigned and redecorated.
The office is being com-
kputerized. Great attention
is paid to keeping member-
ship costs low. Outreach to
singles is planned. There is
a new, active board at
Detroit's Der Arbeiter Ring.

"We want to be a place
where the positive is
stressed, where everyone is
accepted, where the talents
and skills of each is recog-
nized," Mrs. Bates-
Brackett says. "We're try-
ing to help people max-
imize who they are."
"Of course there's still a
lot of, 'You mean you're
still around?' " within the
Jewish community, she
says. "I hear that. I just tell
people, 'Not only are we
still here, we're here in
spades.' " ❑

I NEWS I

Israel May Have
Largest Army

Los Angeles (JTA) —
Israel, whose defense spen-
ding per capita is the highest
in the world, may now also
have the largest military
force in proportion to its
population.

Until recently, Iraq had 53
soldiers on active duty for
every 1,000 residents, the
highest proportion in the
world, followed by Israel
with 42.6,
With the destruction of
much of Iraq's armed forces,
Israel now appears to top the
list, followed by North
Korea, Syria and Cuba. The
United States ranks 20th.
As for military spending,
Israel ranks No. 1, laying
out $1,373.91 per inhabitant
in 1990-91. Second is the
United States, with
$1,165.13 per capita. Other
high spenders include Saudi
Arabia in third place, the
United Kingdom in fifth
($589.24 per capita), Syria in
12th, and Egypt in 15th.
The Times based its fig-
ures on data from the Inter-
national Institute for Stra-
tegic Studies.

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

29

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