100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

February 22, 1991 - Image 39

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS I

Ears Tuned
To Missile Pitch

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Confined
to a room sealed with tape
and plastic sheets against
poison gas, yet still wearing
gas masks, thousands of
Israelis enduring the Scud
missile blitz depend on their
ears to let them know what's
happening. Their radios are
the source of official infor-
mation and instructions. But
after four weeks of intermit-
tent missile attacks that
have injured hundreds and
damaged more than 7,000
homes in the Tel Aviv and
Ramat Gan areas, most peo-
ple are tuned to more im-
mediate sounds.
If, two minutes after the
alert sirens sound, the now-
familiar "whoosh" of a
Patriot anti-missile missile,
not unlike the sound of an
express train, has not been
heard, the people can be fair-
ly certain that whatever was
incoming is not headed in
their direction.
But every time the
Patriots make their noisy
way skyward, there are a
few tense seconds of listen-
ing.
The midair explosion of a
Patriot intercepting a Scud
presages a shower of debris
that can cause heavy
damage and casualties.
Some people relax when
they hear the ear-splitting
blast of a Scud warhead.
They are convinced, rightly
or wrongly, that the louder
the explosion the more likely
it is that the Scud carried a
conventional warhead.
No one has yet heard the
sound a chemical warhead
makes, and all hope and
pray they never will.

Israel Willing
To Talk Peace

Jerusalem (JTA) — Israel
is willing to discuss peace in-
itiatives for the postwar
period, but not until the
fighting in the Persian Gulf
has ended, Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir indicated.
In an address to the Board
of Governors of the Jewish
Agency for Israel, which is
meeting in Jerusalem, the
premier said, "We are ready
— even anxious — to engage
in peace talks at the ap-
propriate time. But who can
tell what the Middle East
and the Gulf region will look
like after the war?"
Mr. Shamir stressed that
the international commun-
ity should have learned
some lessons from the war
that could be applied to the
Middle East peace process.

YES "THERE REALLY IS A ROSLYN!"

,

who cares how you look and feel in your
clothes all day long. Just because you
wear that perfect on-the-job look, it
doesn't mean you're strictly 9 to 5
underneath. Come in and be fitted by a
staff of experts who will solve your
necessities, be it a petticoat length or a
special bra. We'll keep you feeling strictly
feminine 9 to 5 or 5 to 9.
Don't forget we have the perfect
swimsuit for you, too!

WE ENJOY SHOPPING WITH YOU!

Roslyn's Intimate Apparel

Applegate Square

Northwestern and Inkster Road
Daily 10-5:30
Thurs. 10-8

353-5522

A HISTORY OF
HELPING

Ruth Laredo, a talented young Detroit
pianist, left town more than 25 years ago to
attend the prestigious Curtis Institute of
Music. Although tuition was free, her family
needed help to pay for her transportation
and living expenses.

That help came from the JVS staff, which
administers the Jewish Educational Loan
Service (then called the Jewish Scholarship
Service). Ruth received an interest - free loan
to help her pursue her dream). And now, as a
well known concert pianist, she shares her
gift with the world.

THE FINEST IN HOME SECURITY

Every year, JVS helps hundreds of young
people to define and reach their -
academic goals, and to overcome
financial obstacles.

Since its founding in 1941, JVS has helped
thousands of people find success and fulfill-
ment in their working lives. Now, as we
celebrate our 50th anniversary, we invite the
entire community to share our pride in
a half - century of service to the community.

4 ffi liv el yah

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

39

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan