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February 15, 1991 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I DETROIT]

WHATEVER THE OTHER DEALERS CHARGE ...

MEL PARR WILL SELL FOR LESS!

Yad Ezra

Continued from preceding page

.

"WE WANT TO EARN YOUR BUSINESS!

PLUS . . . DRIVE ANY OF THESE CARS
AND GET FEBRUARY DISCOUNTS!

Mel Farr Ford

967,3700

FORD

24750 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park, MI 48237

MIKE SCHNEIDER
MARK NESSEL

NEW '91
ESCORT

; 4414

BUY $6,557

• ///,

Stk #1006

48 mos. S175 sec. dep.

LEASE $ 166.96/mo.

NEW '91

TAURUS

wqm T Irkv

BUY $11,733

Stk. #888

36 mos. S250 sec. dep.

TOYOTA

LEASE $ 249.93/mo.

333.3300

Mel Farr Toyota

1961 S. Telegraph Rd.
North of Square Lake

1951 S. Telegraph Rd.
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48013

JAY PUZIO

NEW '91
CELICA

15 to

BUY $11,980

LEASE $198.70/mo.

Stk. #1281

60 mos. $200 sec. dep.

NEOMMAIRENR2 V:°

`, •

Stk. #1450

60 mos. S200 sec. dep.

MERCURY

LI NCOLN

4178 Highland Rd. (M.59)
at Pontiac Lake Rd.

MEL FARR
MERCURYILINCOLN

4178 Highland Road
(M-59 near Pontiac Lake Road)
WATERFORD

NEW '91
CAMRY

BUY 111890

25 to

from

LEASE $ 249.93/mo.

Mel Farr
Lincoln Mercury

683,9500

LOU GORDON OR
MICKEY GOLDBERG

"Fully loaded'

NEW '91
GRAND MARQUIS

BUY $ 16,1745°

LEASE $ 339.37/mo.

36 mos. 5375 sec. dep.

Stk. #L0163

NEW '91

CONTINENTAL

BUY $ 25,163

LEASE $465.39/mo.

60 mos. S200 sec. dep.

Stk. #L0520

All vehicles plus tax, Title. Lic. Lease pymt. on CONTINENTAL & GRAND MARQUIS BASED ON 24 tv10. CLOSED END LEASE. 30,000 MI. LIMIT 11'
PER MILE EXCESS. CONT. REQUIRES 1ST MO. PLUS $415.00 SEC. DEPT. GRAND MARQUIS REQUIRES 1ST MO. PLUS $375 SEC. DEP. TO GET TOTAL AMT.
OF PYMTS. MULTIPLY PYMT. BY # MONTHS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED SALE ENDS 6 PM FRIDAY FEB. 22, 1991. PHOTOS MAY
'91 vehicles in stock only.
NOT REPRESENT ACTUAL VEHICLES ON SALE AT ADVERTISED PRICES.

16

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1991

Ezra struggled to raise
enough money. By July, Yad
Ezra funds were so depleted
that cereal, vegetable oil,
canned fruit — all pantry
staples — were out of stock.
But thanks to grassroots
fund-raising efforts, food
drives, and some foundation
donations, Yad Ezra is back
on track.
With the help of Jewish
Family Service, area rabbis
and social workers, Yad
Ezra has reached out to the
general Jewish community,
said Mrs. Abramowitz, the
pantry's assistant director.
A year ago whenever she
mentioned Yad Ezra, "the
most likely response was
`What is a Yad Ezra?' " Mrs.
Eizelman said. "We don't hear
that remark any more. The
word's out.
"But we still have those
people who don't believe
there is a Jewish hunger
problem," Mrs. Eizelman.
said. She estimates there are
as many as 4,000 Jews in the
area who need some type of
food assistance.
Today, 30 percent of the
pantry's clientele are
American and all but three
or four families are Jewish.
For those unable to get to
Yad Ezra, volunteers pack
bundles of food and make
deliveries to Madison
Heights, Centerline and
Detroit, said Mrs. Eizelman,
adding 40 percent of their
clientele are elderly. Not
only do clients get food, but
advice on where to find other
social services they could
use.
As the economy gets
worse, Mrs. Eizelman ex-
pects to see more people
struggling with big bills and
unemployment reaching out
to Yad Ezra for help.
"Recession has hit sales

people hard," said Mrs.
Abramowitz. Layoffs have
struck both white and blue
collar jobs, making it
difficult for many, including
those not traditionally af-
fected by a poor economy, to
make ends meet. Although
the majority of their clients
have Detroit, Oak Park and
Southfield addresses, a few
also read Farmington Hills
and West Bloomfield, she
said.
Sometimes clients only
need Yad Ezra's services for
a few months while they get
themselves back on track,
Mrs. Eizelman said. "Many
times when volunteers say
to clients, 'See you next
month,' they reply, 'We hope
we won't have to,' " she said.
Mrs. Abramowitz holds up
two large bundles of index
cards showing how many
clients Yad Ezra has served
in the past year that no
longer need the service. But
for every one of those cards,
there is another client to
take that place, she said.
"Many people are petrified
to come in to see us," Mrs.
Eizelman said. "They are
afraid when they do come in
they will be recognized."
"We had one client who
knew me," Mrs. Eizelman
said. "I was upset because
she got upset. She's not been
back since even though I
know she needs the help.
She's embarrassed to come,"
she said, even though Mrs.
Eizelman could arrange to be
out of the office during the
visit.
If clients are afraid of rec-
ognition, they can come in
an hour earlier or after
hours to take food, Mrs.
Eizelman said. "We want to
respect the confidentiality.
We're here to help, not to
judge." 0

Seminar Helps Educators
Discuss The Gulf War

SUSAN GRANT

Staff Writer

ally Fitlow's eighth
grade students at
Temple Shir Shalom
can't seem to stop talking
about the Persian Gulf war.
Ever since hostilities
broke out in the Persian
Gulf, Mrs. Fitlow has aban-
doned some of her lesson
plans on comparative re-
ligion to give teens time to
ask questions about the war.
"They're scared. Many of
them have friends and fami-
ly in Israel," Mrs. Fitlow
said. While she tries to an-
swer all their questions,

when one of her students
asked, "Why do they all hate
us?" Mrs. Fitlow knew she
needed more information.
To help Mrs. Fitlow and
other Jewish educators an-
swer questions such as these
in the classroom, a seminar
was held Feb. 12 on the Mid-
dle East.
"We've been getting a lot
of calls from teachers who
want to have more informa-
tion on Israel to give to the
kids," said Sivan Maas,
community shlicha.
Sponsored by the Israel
Desk of the Jewish Welfare
Federation, Agency for Jew-
ish Education and Jewish
Educators Council of

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