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The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 18, 1991 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BERKLEY TOURS
& TRAVEL INC.

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER'S

PHANTOM OF THE
OPERA • TORONTO

179

WEEKEND PACKAGES THROUGH JUNE
TRAIN PACKAGES ALSO AVAILABLE

feeding Me Jewish timigry

FLORIDA
SPECIALS -1991

1.CIRCLE TOUR

(ORLANDO, JACKSONVILLE, ST.
AUGUSTINE, FT. LAUDERDALE,
HOLLYWOOD, KEY WEST,
CLEARWATER)

BUY A CASE OF FOOD!

Use this coupon to help feed the Jewish hungry. YAD EZRA
will use your donations to purchase cases of food and
distribute them to our neighbors in need.

INN NM I ■ 1 111= MN NI= MEI MIN MINI NNW MIN NNW

NNW

MARK AN "X" NEXT TO THE FOODS
YOU WISH TO BUY FOR THE HUNGRY

1 case 6.5 oz. chunk tuna in water
1 case peanut butter (creamy)
1 case Quaker oatmeal (18 oz.)
1 case thin spaghetti (16 oz.)
1 case Bisquick (40 oz.)
1 case Matzo Meal (12 oz.)
1 case Horowitz-Margaretan
soup mix in tubes (6 oz.)
❑ 1 case raw rice (1 lb.)









$25.00 case
$21.00 case
$35.00 case
$15.00 case
$26.85 case
$29.25 case

$13.75 case
$12.33 case

Enclosed is my check in the amount of $
case(s) of food as a tax deductible contri-
for
bution to YAD EZRA to help feed the Jewish hungry.

Name

109 9

pp

DBL.
BUS • HOTELS • TOURS • MEALS • EPCOT OR
DISNEY WORLD • DINNER THEATRES & MUCH
MORE'

FEB. 20-MARCH 8

$

2. ORLANDO, WEST PALM
BEACH, ST. AUGUSTINE

$ 899 DBL.
FEB. 23-MARCH 7
BUS • HOTELS • DAY CRUISE • MEALS • EP-
COT OR DISNEY WORLD • EXCITING TOURS
& MORE'

1

CLEVELAND, OHIO

MARCH 9-10
"ZIEGFELD"
JUNE 8-9
"LIZA MINNELLI"
APRIL 27-28
"M BUTTERFLY"

165 Dz.
$ 1 75
$ 1 65 ZL.

$

ALL INCLUDE BUS, PLAY, HOTEL, DINNER,
BREAKFAST, BRUNCH, TOUR.

IRISH SWEEPSTAKES
GRAND TRAVERSE RESORT

TRAVERSE CITY, MI

$

MARCH 15-17

2 39

• BUS • 2 NITES RESORT • "LAS VEGAS"
PARTY • MEALS

"A CHORUS LINE"
TOLEDO

$ 56 PP

APRIL 7

• BUS, LUNCH, SHOW

Address

OSHKOSH, WIS.
REMEMBERS WWII

City/State/Zip

Make checks payable to: YAD EZRA
and mail to: 15670 W. 10 Mile, Suite 107
Southfield, MI 48075

For more information, call (313) 557-FOOD (3663).

50th ANNIVERSARY
COMMEMORATIVE TOUR
APRIL 14.17 or MAY 20.23

DBL
329 "
• 3 NITES HOTEL • MEALS • BALL • TOURS
AND MUCH MORE!

CALL FOR ADDITIONAL
MOTORCOACH TRIPS
AS WELL AS ALL
YOUR TRAVEL NEEDS
INCLUDING AIRFARE
AND CRUISES!

Big
Sale

on Handbags

Ea

Dr. M. Gottesman • Dr. M. Weishaus

Optometrists

Applegate Square

Northwestern Hwy.
(between 12 & 13 Mile Road)

58

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1991

Call 358-2920

Continued from preceding page

Henry Wilson attended its
dedication in 1876.
Today, although it's no
longer a functioning
synagogue, it's open to
visitors as a museum, offering
them the chance to trace the
early growth of' Washington's
Jewish life.
On display in the Lillian
and Albert Small Jewish
Museum on the first floor of
the building are photos
showing Jewish grocery
stores, kosher butchers and
other small businesses that
were part of the first Jewish
neighborhood in Washington,
not far from Adas Israel. Also
displayed are newspaper ar-
ticles of the time that report
the founding of Adas Israel.

It came about when tradi-
tional members broke off
from the earliest congrega-
tion, Washington Hebrew,
founded in 1852. These tradi-
tionalists saved their money
and built their own syna-
gogue by 1876. They later
moved to larger quarters and
finally to the current modern
Adas Israel at Conneticut and
Porter.
They managed to save their
first sanctuary when it was
slated for demolition in
1968. By then it was no
longer used as a synagogue,
but it held special signifi-
cance for Washington Jews.
So a group of congregants
and other citizens rallied to
the cause, and the city agreed
to lease a new site for Adas
Israel at Third and G Streets.
In 1969, the entire synagogue

was carefully moved to the
present site and then restored
over a five year period.
"To us, this restoration is
important in the culture of
our people because we have
always considered the syna-
gogue as the backbone of
Jewish life," Albert Small
said at the time. Mr. Small
was the philanthropist whose
gift helped restore the
building and open it to the
public in 1975.
Besides viewing the ex-
hibits downstairs, visitors can
climb the wooden stairs to the
second floor to see the
restored sanctuary. It's a sim-
ple, stately room with wooden
bimah, plain wooden pews, a
women's balcony above and a
central chandelier.
Then, visitors often go back
downstairs to look at the ex-
hibit which shows how the en-
tire synagogue was in-
geniously transported from
the southeast corner of Sixth
and G Streets to its new site.
It was quite a project. Some
270 tons of bricks and lumber
were strapped with steel
bands, lifted onto dollies and
moved three blocks, as traffic
stopped and cameras record-
ed how the shell was placed
on a new foundation.
The dramatic recounting of
how a historic synagogue was
saved, restored and rededi-
cated is carefully detailed in
the Lillian and Albert Small
Museum. It's just one exam-
ple of how Washington's
Jewish museums are a
capital attraction for the
Jewish traveler. ❑

$

1-800-875-TOUR or
559-8620

Eye Examinations
Ultimate Eyewear
Custom Contact Lenses

Washington Museums

P.P.

DBL.
From
• R.T. BUS • EXCELLENT PHANTOM SEAT • 1
OR 2 NITES HOTEL • TOUR (2 NITE PKG. ONLY)

YAD EZRA

1 TRAVEL

29815 Northwestern Hwy.
In Applegate Square

11,

II

357-1800

Open Thursda y
to 8 p.:.00/

AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY'

Help us keep winning.

Active Jewish Life
In Bern, Switzerland

RUTH ROVNER

Special to The Jewish News

I

t's almost time for the
clock to strike. Visitors
stand expectantly near
the distinctive clock tower in
Bern. Every hour, they gather
like clockwork to watch the
ingenious way the 16th cen-
tury clock strikes the hour.
Four minutes before the
clock strikes, the mechanical
display begins. Colorful
animals move in a circle
around the figure of King
Chronos. The king counts the
hours as another figure
strikes the gong.
Behind us, there's the echo
of horse's hooves on the cob-
blestone streets as a carriage
goes by. All around us are ar-
cades and beautifully
preserved medieval buldings.
The medieval tone of the
Swiss capital is one of its
charms. Founded in 1191, it is

one of the few medieval cities
remaining in Europe that was
never destroyed, bombed or
torn down. Declared a world
landmark by the United Na-
tions in 1983, Bern's old sec-
tor has streets covered with

The Jewish
community was
founded 150 years
ago by Alsatian
Jews who were
very assimilated.

nearly four miles of arcades.
These streets — wonderful
for shopping in any weather
— are lined with turreted
sandstone buildings which
now house antique shops and
restaurants. Beyond the ar-
cades, the centers of many
streets have historic
fountains.
Besides these, Bern has

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