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January 11, 1991 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOCAL NEWS

WHATEVER THE OTHER DEALERS CHARGE ...

MEL PARR WILL SELL FOR LESS!

PLUS . . . DRIVE ANY OF THESE
CARS AT LAST YEAR'S PRICES!
FORD
967,3700

-
. !

u
-

,

24750 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park, MI 48237

24750 Brumfield Rd.
at 10 Mils Rd.

Mel Farr Ford

MEL FARR
FORD

0 TI r RD.

1

MIKE SCHNEIDER
MARK NESSEL

NEW '91
ESCORT

FR. ONLY

,, „,.:;::•:

,

$6,990

NEW '91
TAURUS

FR. ONLY

$11,690

TOYOTA

ISSI S. Telowsph
Ranh of Squirt LAO

1951 S. Telegraph Rd.
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48013

Orohyd lk. Rd.

MEL FARR
TOYOTA

Slum U. Rd.

Mel Farr Toyota

333,3300

JAY PUZIO

NEW '91
CELICA

FR. ONLY

$12,290

NEW '91
CAM RY

FR. ONLY

-„,:romigemonallamme

c e. 4 - , , - i-

5 12.390

Mel Farr
Lincoln Mercury

MERCURY

• )

LI NCOLN

4178 Highland Road
(M.59 near Pontiac Lake Road)
WATERFORD

683,9500

LOU GORDON OR
MICKEY GOLDBERG

NEW '91
TOWN CAR

LEASE ONLY

Merl
, 9r

, ,

........

$458.72

NEW '91
CONTINENTAL

LEASE ONLY

$439.22

All vehicles plus tax, Title, Lic. Lease pymt. on CONTINENTAL & TOWN CAR BASED ON 24 MO. CLOSED END LEASE. 30,000 MI. LIMIT 11' PER MILE
EXCESS. CONT. REQUIRES 1ST MO. PLUS S415,00 SEC. DEPT. TOWN CAR REQUIRES 1ST MO. PLUS S500 SEC. DEP. TO GET TOTAL AMT. OF PYMTS. MULTIPLY
PYMT. BY # MONTHS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED SALE ENDS 6 PM FRIDAY JAN. 18, 1991. PHOTOS MAY NOT REPRESENT ACTUAL
'90 and '91 vehicles in stock only.
VEHICLES ON SALE AT ADVERTISED PRICES.

20

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1991

Funeral Service

Continued from Page 1

between Greenfield and
Coolidge. Mr. Dorfman ex-
pects to hire a full-time sec-
retary. All other employees
will work part-time.
Mr. Dorfman said funerals
will be arranged and con-
ducted according to Halacha,
shomer, or
or Jewish law.
watchman, will be available
at all times.
Services will not take
place at the building, which
will be used to provide fu-
neral arrangements, store
some caskets and house
bodies of the deceased before
burial.
Basic cost for a Direction
service, which includes
house calls for funeral ar-
rangements, removal of the
deceased to the parlor, a
shomer, professional and
clerical services, tahara and
tachrichim, or washing and
preparing for the funeral,
obtaining and filing legal
documents, graveside,
cemetery or temple/
synagogue service, is $995.
Mr. Dorfman said he would
work out special prices
for families with financial
problems.
The basic charge is less
than Kaufman, $1550, and
Hebrew Memorial, $1395.
Both chapels arrange
graveside services for the
same amount as those per-
formed in the chapel.
Coffins, not included in basic
service charges, range in
price from $295 for a pine
box at Hebrew Memorial to
thousands of dollars for a
casket made of mahogany.
Estimates from officials at
both existing funeral homes
show the average Jewish fu-
neral in Detroit costs $3,500.
Officials from Kaufman and
Hebrew Memorial said they
have never turned away a
family that couldn't afford
their charges.
"I don't feel people go to a
funeral home based on
price," said Kaufman Presi-
dent Herbert Kaufman. "I
think service is the answer.
To promote a graveside ser-
vice is disrespectful for the
deceased."
News of Mr. Dorfman's
new business raises ques-
tions about whether a need
exists for an alternative fu-
neral service promoting the
graveside service. Rabbis
said there has never been a
case in which one of the
homes couldn't accom-
modate a family in a com-
munity where 1,000 to 1,200
Jewish burialE take place
each year.
Kaufman arranges about
60 percent of the services;
Hebrew Memorial handles
40 percent.
"Nobody can do what we

Alan Dorfman:
A new direction.

do here," said Kaufman Fu-
neral Director David
Techner. "We are much
more worried about the ac-
ceptance of the graveside
service than about the loss of
income.
"I don't want to cheapen
the funeral service," Mr.
Techner said. "He can't
compete with us. Neither
can Hebrew Memorial."
Rabbi Elliot Pachter of
Adat Shalom Synagogue
said he hasn't considered
competition since he has
never experienced a problem
at either chapel.
"I do whatever the family
wants," Rabbi Pachter said.
"I don't think people are
missing anything when they
opt for graveside. In some
ways, it is more traditional
to have a graveside service."
Rabbi Martin Berman of
Congregation Beth Achim
said, "The size of the com-
munity probably wouldn't
justify three different places,
but there is nothing wrong
with the concept of competi-
tion. It gives people more of
an opportunity to choose.
"I came from Denver,
where 75 percent of the fu-
nerals were graveside and
that worked out fine. I found
them to be a lot easier. You
have everybody there and
you didn't have to have a
procession and two funer-
als," Rabbi Berman said. "It
all depends on what the peo-
ple of the community want."
Rabbi Lane Steinger of
Temple Emanu-El in Oak
Park said graveside service
follows the mitzvah of
L'Vaah, accompanying the
body to its final resting
place.
He came to Detroit from
St. Louis, where he said the
majority of Jewish funerals
were graveside.
"It's much more ap-
propriate to go to the

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