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December 14, 1990 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

OU Testifies On Crisis
In The Persian Gulf

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JAMES D. BESSER

Washington Correspondent

I

29815 Northwestern Highway

In Applegate Square

ALL 1990 CITY OF DETROIT SECOND-HALF
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ALL REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX BILLS
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quest a duplicate by mail or in person at Room 136
City County Building, Monday through Friday from
8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Interest and Penalty charges
must be added if second-half tax is not paid by
January 15, 1991. Failure to receive a bill will not
defer accrual of Interest and Penalty.
Kindly include Ward and Item Number when re-
questing bills by mail. Taxpayers may also request
duplicate bills via the telephone at 224-3560.

Tax Information - 224-3560
SECOND HALF DUE
January 15, 1991

Virginia Sikora
Treasurer
CITY OF DETROIT

t was a strange cast of
characters at last week's
hearings of the Senate
foreign relations committee.
The lineup included Rev.
Jesse Jackson, the National
Council of Churches, which
recently promulgated a
statement calling for an
American withdrawal from
the Gulf and suggesting the
need to link any settlement
to a solution to the
Palestine-Israel problem —
and the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of
America.
The OU was specifically
asked to testify, according to
Capitol Hill sources, because
of its friendly position
towards U.S. involvement in
the confrontation across the
Saudi border.
"The idea was to get some
input from religious

Jewish groups in Wash-
ington participate in an as-
tounding range of issues.
But when it comes to the
problems posed by the AIDS

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44

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1990

661-0177

people with AIDS and to
marshal resources to fight
the disease.

"What we're trying to do is
revive the project, to turn it
into something that's ge-
nuinely national in scope,"
he said. "Among other
things, we want to be a
resource and a 'nudge' for
Jewish organizations that
are responding to AIDS."
Rose agreed that Jewish

organizations have been
slow to respond to the AIDS
crisis. But there are signs
that the situation may be
brightening.

Jews, he said, continue to
believe that AIDS is some-
thing that does not affect
their own community.
The recent meeting in
Washington was a first step
in changing that perception,
he said.

Jewish S. African Envoy
Tries To End Sanctions

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groups," said an aide to a
Jewish senator. "But then
they looked around — and
realized that everyone
scheduled to testify was
solidly opposed to the ad-
ministration's policies."
That oversight was ap-
parently corrected by Sen.
Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who
sought OU's participation in
the hearing as minority
witnesses.

National Jewish AIDS
Project Is Revived

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Jesse Helms:
Sought OU's support.

"We wanted to express our
strong support for the presi-
dent's basic policies in the
region," said William Rap-
fogel, director of the OU's
Institute for Public Affairs.
"At the same time, we want-
ed to raise some questions
about the way he's going
about keeping the coalition
together."
The Orthodox group also
emphasized the need for
presidential flexibility in
deciding on a military re-
sponse.
"We expressed the position
that the president must have
the military option — and
the flexibility to make quick
decisions," Mr. Rapfogel
said. "We're not saying we
should jump right in and go
to war. But the president
shouldn't be forced to sit and
wait for 18 months. He
should consult with Con-
gress — but in the final
analysis, this should be his
call."

Andy Rose:
Prospective resource, nudge.

epidemic, the organized Jew-
ish community here has
been slow to respond.
That may change soon
when the National Jewish
AIDS Project moves into
high gear after a sputtering
start several years ago.
Recently, the group's new
executive director, Andy
Rose, met with six Washing-
ton representatives for Jew-
ish groups. The goal was to
work out new strategies for
Jewish involvement in the
multi-layered battle to help

South Africa has ap-
pointed a new ambassador to
Washington. And the choice
of Harry Schwarz to the im-
portant diplomatic post has
raised some Jewish
eyebrows.

Mr. Schwarz himself is
Jewish and has been a
prominent leader in South
Africa's Jewish Board of
Deputies, the central Jewish
organization in that country.
The new ambassador, who
will assume his duties in
March, fled Nazi Germany
with his parents. During
World War II, he served with
South African forces.

More importantly, Mr.
Schwarz has been point man
in recent efforts to convince
the American public — and
the Jewish community in
particular — to press for an
end to economic sanctions
against the Pretoria
government.

Jewish groups played a
key role in the fight to im-
pose sanctions designed to
pressure South Africa into
abandoning apartheid, and
they are regarded as a key to
any effort to remove sanc-
tions in the wake of the
South African government's
liberalization.

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