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December 14, 1990 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

I

Federation Trip

Continued from Page 1

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22

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1990

the number of people going.
"I think that people nor-
mally have concerns in
times of uncertainty about
the implications of a decision
to travel into an area where
there is a possibility of
military action," he said.
Past Federation President
Dr. Conrad Giles, who also
signed on to take the trip,
said it would be unfair to
judge any Jew's commit-
ment to Israel on the basis of
their willingness to go to
Israel during a time of world
unrest.
"The concerns that every
American has are shared by
every American Jew," Dr.
Giles said. "Nobody wishes
to place their lives and
families in jeopardy with
any military action. There is
an understandable concern
with all of us as the date of
Jan. 19 approaches recogniz-
ing the deadline of Jan. 15
imposed on Iraq. To find
yourself four days after that
date in the middle of a possi-
ble conflict is at least distur-
bing.
"If there was a military
conflict, I know my par-
ticipation would be ques-
tionable at that point," he
said. "But, as I go around
the community, I don't think
our commitment is waver-
ing. I think we are concern-
ed, and I think our concern is
rational. It has nothing to do
with our commitment to
Israel, but everything to do
with our concern with world
affairs." El

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JEWELERS

the rest of the country that it
cares enough to journey to
the Middle East even when
other federations are choos-
ing not to go.
"I would love to take 200
people," he said. "But it's
difficult. I think it's got to be
said that the government of
Israel would never let us
travel there if they felt that
there would be danger. The
same thing goes with our
State Department. If there
was danger, this trip would
be put on the shelf."
There is no deadline for
registration for the trip, but
Mr. Berke said it is impor-
tant for those interested in
making the trip to inform
the Federation as soon as
possible.
"This is not a fund-raising
mission or anything like
that," Mr. Berke said. "This
is an opportunity for us to
show solidarity with the
people of Israel who are
under an enormous threat.
The well from America has
dried up, and this is an op-
portunity for the Federation
leadership to be together
during an important time in
an important place."
Mr. Berke said the trip is
open to Federation leader-
ship, the presidents and ex-
ecutives of Federation agen-
cies and some contributors.
Mr. Schlussel, who is
taking the trip, said he is op-
timistic that even at this
late date, more people will
join in, and it is still too soon
to make any judgment on

Political Asylum

Continued from Page 1

country.
In addition to cash funding
from American Jewish
agencies, refugees receive
public assistance and
Medicaid from the U.S.
government.
U.S. policy does not,
however, provide aid for
those seeking asylum here.
And Jewish organizations
have established a policy
that, because of limited
funds, they do not give cash
money to anyone but refu-
gees.
Immigration and
Naturalization officials said
government benefits are
made available to refugees
because that is the proper
channel for those seeking to
live in the United States.
With millions of men, wo-
men and children trying to
enter the country, asylum
should be used only by those
who have no other option,
they said.

Unlike other persecuted
aliens, Soviet Jews can eas-
ily emigrate to Israel if
they do not wish to come to
the United States as refu-
gees, INS officials said.
In fiscal year 1990-91, the
United States admitted
50,716 refugees from the
Soviet Union — the largest
number of refugees from any
country. Almost all were
Jews.
In the next fiscal year, an-
other 50,000 Soviet
emigrants will be admitted
to the United States. But
this makes just a dent in the
burgeoning list of those
wishing to settle here. Last
year alone, 600,000 Soviet
citizens applied for refugee
status in the United States.
In addition to refugees, the
United States grants en-
trance to 2,000 parolees each
month. Unlike refugees,
parolees do not receive so-
cial-service funding and

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