100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 07, 1990 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I UP FRONT

Opportunity To 'Clear The Air'
Afforded By Shamir Visit To U.S.

DAVID LANDAU

Special to The Jewish News

T

he Bush administra-
tion and the Israeli
government are look-
ing at next week's meeting
between President George
Bush and Israel Prime Min-
ister Yitzhak Shamir as an
opportunity to set aside the
tensions that have strained
relations between the two
nations in recent months.
"Both men, Bush and
Shamir, are conscious that
the stories of the bad chem-
istry between them" have
"gotten out of hand," David
Harris, executive vice presi-
dent of the American Jewish
Committee, said Monday
after he and six other top of-
ficials of the group held a 45-
minute meeting in
Jerusalem with Mr. Shamir.
"Our reading is that both
sides would like this to be a
positive meeting and to con-
tribute to removing recent
tensions, frictions and
misunderstandings," he
said.

JTA correspondent Howard
Rosenberg contributed to this
report.

Mr. Harris was in
Jerusalem heading an
AJCommittee solidarity
mission to Israel, dubbed
"Operation Undaunted,"
that brought 125 of the
group's top members from
across the United States to
meet with Israeli political
leaders and tour the country.
Mr. Shamir will meet with
the president on Dec. 11, a
day after receiving the
Jabotinsky Foundation's
Defender of Jerusalem
Award in New York. While
in Washington, he is also
scheduled to meet with Vice
President Dan Quayle, Sec-
retary of State James Baker,
Defense Secretary Dick
Cheney and members of
Congress. While Mr. Shamir
will not ask Mr. Bush for
any new economic or
military aid, he is expected
to lay the groundwork for
future additional U.S. aid to
help Israel resettle the
thousands of Soviet Jewish
immigrants arriving each
week.
"I believe that we will find
receptive ears in this
regard," Zalman Shoval,
Israel's new ambassador to
the United States, told

representatives of the Jew-
ish news media in Washing-
ton.
A pro-Israel lobbyist in
Washington said Israel will
seek hundreds of millions of
dollars in new U.S. refugee
assistance at a later date.
Such aid would be in the
form of U.S. guarantees for
loans from private banks,
like the $400 million in U.S.
housing assistance for the
immigrants approved earlier
this year.
In the military sphere,
Israel wants to wait until
the end of the Persian Gulf
crisis before asking for any
new weaponry. Mr. Shamir
feels that such proposals
"should only be decided
upon after this crisis is
over," Mr. Shoval said.
That position appears to be
aimed at thwarting any new
U.S. arms flow to Arab coun-
tries as the crisis wears on.
The Bush administration is
expected to propose a $15
billion arms sale to Saudi
Arabia after the new Con-
gress convenes in January.
From Israel's standpoint,
the success of the Bush-
Shamir meeting depends in
part on how Washington

Mr. Shamir and Mr. Bush during their 1989 meeting at the White House.

handles proposals currently
before the U.N. Security
Council to step up monitor-
ing of conditions for Palesti-
nians under Israeli ad-
ministration.
If Washington supports
the idea of convening the
signatories of the Fourth
Geneva Convention to
discuss the Palestinian
situation, or if it backs a
proposal to dispatch a U.N.
ombudsman to monitor the
situation in the ad-
ministered territories, that
would be a source of deep
concern for Israel and would
exacerbate current
U.S.-Israeli tensions, said
Mr. Harris of AJCommittee.
If the United States fails to
veto any U.N. resolutions to

that effect, "it will certainly
harm the goals that both -
countries have in this
meeting" between Bush and
Shamir, said Mr. Shoval.
For its part, the United
States wants Mr. Shamir to
give a strong reaffirmation
of his commitment to the
peace process and demon-
strate his "willingness to
consider ideas that could
lead to a breakthrough,"
said Mr. Harris, who met
with White House officials
before setting out for Israel.
The Bush administration
will be "watching Mr.
Shamir's public statements
from now until Dec. 11" for
any sign of progress in the
peace process, he said.

vide "A Page of Testimony"
form, which records the in-
dividual's name and
background before and dur-
ing the war. The information
is maintained in the Yad
Vashem archives.
To receive a form, write
Yad Vashem, P.O. Box 3477,
Jerusalem, Israel.

in the new book, El Al, Star
in the Sky.
All entries must be receiv-
ed by Dec. 31 and sent to El
Al Israel Airlines, do Public
Relations; 120 W. 45th St,
18th floor; New York, N.Y.
10036.

Jewish Telegraphic Agency

ROUND UP

Dial 1-800
For Chanukah

New York — A new 800
line will bring a free tele-
phone message about the
meaning of Chanukah to
callers from across the coun-
try.
The pre-recorded line, 1-
(242-6852),
800-C
is sponsored by Chizuk, the
Jewish outreach project of
Agudath Israel, and will in-
clude information on the
laws and customs of the
holiday, as well as a contact
number for help in observing
Chanukah and linking up
with other Jews in the
caller's area.

Yad Vashem
Seeks Martyrs

Jerusalem — Yad Vashem,
the Holocaust memorial of
Israel, is seeking the names

YAD VASHEM

CC

P.O.B3477 Amr•alern,larnel

faUg.1:271.10111,1%
1710.511•11:2120.11.

A Page of Testimony

!SW 1-rn to-n•

- Alm ,met cvmst re

P... MI Cal

.2 oo noncom os ton ern

am Zr' rto to roma ort ortoro, or tnoorm to orv•I. re =rasa
Mat art Inroonormo II 1.2“,7713 2MT Ti.3 <7 ” 11= .142.71 aro

sa•rosont to tow:lora n roroa n .-3••• • v. .narocro rrlto ono
.1 -cr, rO3 nom aro 17117 um
3loorn o fro- , -,,,, to-r• Crl
=al. 3ono, On go ..1".. IM-1,C0

• POOrn • rita .1

No., onme •

Peru Maw tooan ...I

Rs« ol 61

„.,

C IL*1 -1"

1.1X. Tir

ure33.-nnu

Martyrs and Hama'

hternfitii

Houston (UPI) — A lawyer
who called a judge "a little
Jew" but insists he is not an-
ti-Semitic was ordered late
last month to serve a 180-
day jail term for contempt of
court.
In his sentencing, district
Judge Mike McSpadden
called Jack Love's "little
Jew" comment a "hateful,
obscene remark" and said he
will ask the Texas state bar
to disbar him.
Mr. Love made his
remarks in court after a dis-
agreement with Court-at-
Law Judge Sherman Ross.
"I'm going to get that little
Jew," Mr. Love told a clerk.
"He does not know this, but
tonight I will burn a cross in
his yard."
Mr. Love told Judge
McSpadden the four months
he must spend in jail are
comparable to the time he
would be interned if he had
received the maximum
sentence for car theft.
"In other words, what I've
done is more reprehensible

"&

,

The line begins Dec. 10
and will continue through
the holiday.

thW if
Ititi,
. 1 gii .r. r; a

‘=

than auto theft'?" he asked
Judge McSpadden.
"That's correct," the judge
said.
"Than cocaine?" Mr. Love
asked.
"That's correct," the judge
said.
"Than murder?" Mr. Love
continued.
"Close," Judge
McSpadden said.

iiil liptrO i g

Lawyer Charged
For Bias Remark

DM.) 112 Ceti.,
can d,-rp

arro or lo ozono-so Won. .2

.• 1 Date el lool.

norrovvan 3

run

ntr:s
.

Name ol eon« no.. or woo) 4 1 Name ol loan yews os ,raw

4

ho•oesoosn•on oo. on Ivo or ono 'No po ,wool
seer

-I

%nolo., ,/ veer

S

' I

Roo a/ mane boron no woe

Morn of nookon ion, t4 on

nen." 'ow on lrovooro .10

arrow...on .1 &on Onr ow, ool

to 103 1117010114. 11M In, ;TM .11

I. Ile manor,

nod.° oo a.

oronnyynyono no An

•• ■ •••1

22,sionnon eon

asoonl,

rd•oionio to (Snood

tenor ardor. no do bum, Is corn« to err too eI n leco•Selee.

Al1201,1•• on UM r+ v., 1.11.12, .2 20 .prylr1 11/7131
.1•O• loon2 too on, ',roan x Vw. .00n2 mere Ven

not pal non Sr...

Place aaal lace

eon...rano

- .MPH" win.. air 1 , 'mina' ,J1'33 oil mini:.
Leto liodn ■ WI II I owe In mine Io.° and %valor, my
Waifs a place and a name . It., SIMI' not be cul of I .......,,,.

• r.

..

-...-,,,

erq. to, •

1202 1/711123
CIIROMMYA =RI nT
now *O. no am. el owe •acai. el Oa Maim.. so "reeve. pm.

Yad Vashem's "Page of
Testimony."

and histories of Holocaust
martyrs and heroes.
The organization will pro-

El Al Hosts
Trivia Contest

New York — El Al Israel
Airlines is sponsoring a
trivia contest, with the
grand prize winner of a free
round-trip ticket to Israel.
The contest questions are:
1) From what source does El
Al recruit all its pilots? 2)
What symbol appears on the
tail of each El Al aircraft? 2)
Name two of El Al's new
1990 routes from Tel Aviv. 4)
What is the meaning of the
name, "El Al"? 5) In 1990,
El Al began "Operation Ex-
odus," the transportation of
100,000 immigrants to
Israel. What country are
these immigrants from?
Information may be found

Armand Hammer
Becomes A Man

Los Angeles — He's built
an international business
and saved the lives of nu-
merous Soviet Jews. Now,
Armand Hammer is about to
make public statement ac-
cepting his responsibilities
as a Jewish male.
Dr. Hammer, 92, will
celebrate his bar mitzvah
Dec. 11 at the Beverly
Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles.
Cable News Network
mogul Ted Turner is
honorary chairman of the
event, with co-chairmen in-
cluding Bob Hope and Mery
Griffin, musician Quincy
Jones and Chrysler Chair-
man Lee Iacocca.

Compiled by
Elizabeth Applebaum

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

5

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan