100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 07, 1990 - Image 132

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ANALYSIS 1

THEs
LINTERS

"Contemporary Women's Sportswear"

"HOLIDAY SALE OF THE BEST KIND"

SAVE on the HOTTEST NEW LOOKS
from NEW YORK and CALIFORNIA

At Savings

Up to 70% off Storewide

SPECIAL MARKDOWNS
FRIDAY, SATURDAY,
SUNDAY ONLY!

James Baker and George Bush.

Baker-To-Baghdad Talks
Worry Pro-Israelis

JAMES D. BESSER

Washington Correspondent

Don't Forget our SPECIAL MIDNIGHT MADNESS SALE
FRI., DEC. 7 10 A.M.-12 MID.
$250.00 Shopping Spree

Holiday Hours

10-7
10-9
10.7
12-4

M-TH
FRI.
SAT.
SUN.

471-5620

33306 Grand River (E. of Farmington Road)
DOWNTOWN FARMINGTON

Layaway
Available

Prior Sales Excluded

Sale Through
December Only

Affordable Clothing • Acceptably Different

Put your feet up after the holiday shopping.
Try a Chelsea Lounger!

DECEMBER 12-16
Savings On:
Frames, Covers,
Pillows & More!

Lounger also converts into a twin size bed.
Natural or black finish.

Happy Holidays

tit-1 ii‘eirtiArke

Natural Bedding and Home Furnishings

Novi Town Center
1-96 & Novi Rd., by Mervyns
349-5040

120

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1990

306 S. Main Street
Royal Oak
548-4422

resident Bush's an-
nouncement that Sec-
retary of State James
Baker would travel to
Baghdad for a last-ditch
effort at diplomacy repre-
sented another major shock
for pro-Israel forces here.
Once again, there were
deep stirrings of unrest over
the fact that a major change
in American policy was not
preceded by consultation
with Israel.
And once again, there was
anxiety that the administra-
tion's lurching, unpredic-
table policy might eventual-
ly lead to a compromise with
Saddam Hussein that would
leave the Iraqi leader armed
to the teeth — and eager for
a new military adventure
that would restore his lost
prestige in the Arab world.
"Leaders in Jerusalem
were just as surprised as
people here who heard it on
the radio," said the Wash-
ington representative of one
major Jewish organization.
"This is just another indica-
tion that Israel's interests
are not being taken into ac-
count as this country
stumbles from one policy to
another."
There was also anxiety
over the fact that the last-
minute decision to begin
face-to-face talks with the
Iraqis represented part of
the payoff for the recent
United Nations vote au-
thorizing the use of force.
"What one now realizes is
that the U.N. resolution did
not come lightly," said Ab-
raham Foxman, executive
director of the Anti-
Defamation League. "It now

p

seems evident that this is
part of the package."
And the president's olive
branch to Baghdad, accor-
ding to other observers,
sends a clear message to
Saddam Hussein that —
despite the growing clamor
in Washington about Iraq's
arsenal of non-conventional
weapons — the administra-
tion is now considering
possible solutions to the Gulf
crisis that would allow the
Iraqi strongman to retain
his military capability.
"The Baghdad visit raises
the issue of whether a
negotiated end of this
dispute will leave Saddam
Hussein's military power in-

If Washington
pursues a
negotiated
settlement with
Saddam, the risk to
Israel will be
heightened.

tact," said Stuart Eizenstat,
former domestic policy ad-
viser to President Jimmy
Carter and a leading pro-
Israel activist. "My belief is
that this is exactly what will
happen — and that the mes-
sage has been sent to
Saddam through this ac-
tion."
If the administration does
pursue some kind of
negotiated settlement with
the Iraqis, Mr. Eizenstat
said, there may be attempts
to impose limits on
Saddam's military stockpile.
"But while there is a
realization that there has to
be some modification of his
military capability, he is
still being offered the possi-
bility of staying in power,"

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan