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November 30, 1990 - Image 94

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TRAVEL

' ••••• •

-• • - • •

• •

: •.;:w••• ••• ••

. .. . ..
•• • • •

Plymouth's Congregation Beth Jacob

A single room is a single room. Even
when two people sleep in it. And Florida
hotels are full of them. But suites are all we
have: 244 of them. And for about the price
you'd pay for a room alone in a Florida hotel
(deluxe rooms in season go for $195 to $270
a day), you can get an absolutely luxurious
2-room suite...with free breakfast every
morning...and 2 hours of free cocktails
every afternoon—in one of the most glam-
orous hotels ever built on the Gold Coast.
The oceanfront Embassy Suites ® Hotel of
Deerfield Beach.
REAL SUITES.
Each suite has a separate living room
with dining area, table, chairs, desk,
refrigerator, wet bar, microwave, sofabed,
armchair, color TV, telephone and bathroom.
Plus a separate bedroom with 2 double beds
(or a King), armoire, marble lavatory, another
color TV and phone. And another bathroom.
A far cry from the typical Florida hotel room.
TWO UNCONSCIONABLE
GIVEAWAYS.
Unlike the rest of the hotel industry, we
give every guest a complete, hot, cooked-to-
order breakfast every morning—totally free.
Plus two hours of free cocktails for every
adult guest, every afternoon. With no check.
No charge. And no tipping. We don't allow it.
IN A LAND OF PLENTY
Our beach—Deerfield—is conveniently
near Florida's famous high-rent districts, yet
mercifully free from their economic orbit.

We're only 5 miles from the barony of
Boca Raton. Only 31 from the principality
of Palm Beach. And 9 from highfalutin'
Ft. Lauderdale.
Within access of it all, but in our own
lovely, sequestered kingdom by the sea.
This winter, don't settle for a room.
Demand a suite. With us.

950 SE 20th Avenue (ALA)
Deerfield Beach, FL 33441

RATES

WEST
PALM BEACH •

(Jan. 16 thru
Apr. 15, 1991)

Palm Beach
Intl
Airport

All 2 Room Suites

-

Ocean View 8215

-

Intracoastal —$195

Based on single occupancy.

Extra person, $10 per day.

Kids under 12 in same suite
stay free.

Special value season
rates in effect thru
Jan. IS 1991.

Daily children's activities
program & full-time
social director

BOCA
RATON •

DEERFIELD
BEACH


FORT
LAUDERDALE


Fort
Lauderdale

Airport

MIAMI

RESERVATIONS 1.800-545-SAND
OR COLLECT 1.305-426-0478

© 1990 AW Management, Inc.

Gail Chicorel Shapiro
Owner

Cruises
ig$2000 OFF!*

SUMMIT TRAVEL &
6 *7pig ns CRUISE SHOPPE
aotn. ,-1FOr:i3: 09:2

HOURS:

94

RENT OUR TOP QUALITY SKI
EQUIPMENT FOR ADULT AND
JUNIOR SKIERS, AVAILABLE BY THE
SEASON OR BY THE DAY.

Hurry in for best selection!

L

489.5888

N

SKIERS:

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1990

r cDong inas

28859 Orchard
Lake Rd. Betw.
1 2 & 13 Mile Rds.

S ro r t h au s

Bloomfield Plaza • Telegraph at Maple
Birmingham, Mich. • 626-9500

A Pilgrim Town
With Jewish Settlers

RUTH ROVNER

Special to The Jewish News

T

he first thing most
tourists do when they
arrive in Plymouth is
visit the famous rock.
But when they reach the
enclosed portico on the water-
front which was built to
shelter Plymouth Rock, some
seem a bit disappointed.
"Is that it? It looks much
smaller than I expected," said
one tourist, as she looked
down at a plain and rather
small boulder with the date
1620 engraved on it.
For most tourists, however,
the power of the rock is its
symbolism, not its size or
shape. The Plymouth tourist
guidebook quotes Alexis De
Tocqueville: "Here is a stone
which the feet of a few out-
casts pressed for an instant;
and the stone becomes
famous; it is treasured by a
great nation; its very dust is
shared as a relic."
Besides its famous rock,
this coastal town 20 miles
south of Boston offers modern
pilgrims — and one million of
them visit each year — a
variety of ways to explore the
life of the original pilgrims
who settled here.
First, tourists can climb
aboard the Mayflower II, a
detailed replica of the
original vessel that took 102
passengers and 28 crew
members on a 60-day journey
across the high seas to
Plymouth.
Walking its decks, visitors
get the feel and flavor of the
difficult life of those cramped
conditions the Pilgrims en-
dured such as the tiny bunk
beds with makeshift curtains.
Other tourist sites include
Pilgrim Hall, a museum with
Pilgrim artifacts; Plimoth
Plantation, an outdoor

museum that recreates a
Pilgrim village.
As for Thanksgiving, no
city celebrates it as Plymouth
does, with a feast of events to
commemorate the Pilgrims'
first Thanksgiving, the
Chamber of Commerce spon-
sors a gala community
Thanksgiving meal. Plimoth
Plantation holds two weeks of
special programs, including
displays of Pilgrim cooking
and authentic recipes.
Appropriately for a town
with a renowned history,
Plymouth has a Jewish com-
munity that is historic, too.
Beth Jacob is the oldest
synagogue in continuing
operation in the state of
Massachusetts.
Dedicated in 1913, the
town's only synagogue is a
modest white clapboard
building which sits on a hill
on Pleasant Street overlook-
ing the town brook.
Of course, Jewish tradition
in Plymouth is recent com-
pared with Pilgrim history.
"Unlike some of the other col-
onies, Massachusetts was not
really open to Jewish settle-
ment," says Rabbi Lawrence
Silverman. "So the first
record in Plymouth of a birth
known to be Jewish was in
1880."
But long before Jews arriv-
ed in Plymouth, the Pilgrims
were studying and sometimes
speaking Hebrew, just as they
did in other New England
communities. In his office,
Rabbi Silverman has a copy of
Governor William Bradford's
book, Hebrew Exercises. Like
other Pilgrims, Gov. Bradford
studied and respected
Hebrew. On his gravestone in
the old Pilgrim cemetery on
Burial Hill, three Hebrew
words are engraved.
But though Hebrew was in
use here, no Jews lived in
Plymouth until 1880. By

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