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November 16, 1990 - Image 90

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COOKING

We Carry
otuofrfinCsity
Mm

ii;

.1113116) Food

'Warehouse

lt■

553-2165

DRIED
CRANBERRIES

$3.99 ..

994 lb.

Exp. 11/23/90

Coupon

Coupon

OATS

ROLLED & QUICK

29 4 lb.

Exp. 11/23/90

Coupon

COFFEE LOGS

RED & GREEN
GLAZED CHERRIES

GOLDEN
RAISINS

Exp. 11/23/90

Coupon

Coupon

Coupon

Mo n.-Sat.
9-9
Sun.
12-5

WE HONOR
ALL OTHER COMPETITOR
COUPONS

ORCHARD 12 PLAZA
27885 ORCHARD LAKE RD. AT 12 MILE

Coupon



Low Calorie

$ 3.89

$ 1 *99 lb.

Exp. 11/23/90

Exp.. 11/23/90

1b.

Coupon

NUTS IN A SHELL
VOORTMAN
Almonds,
SMOOTH
PEANUT
BUTTER
COOKIES
And Pecans

ALL-NATURAL

$ 1 4,00 lb.

Re g. $1.79

NOW 99 4 lb.

$

1.79 11).

Exp. 11/23/90

Exp. 11/23/90

Exp. 11/23/90

Coupon

Coupon

Coupon

Coupon

WHOLE
WALNUT DROWN SUGAR DICED FRUIT
DELUXE
CAKE MIX POPPYSEEDS
MIXED NUTS HALVES 0 PIECES Light & Dark

$2.99 .. $1.99 ..

Exp. 11/23/90

C

0
U
P
0
N

Exp. 11/23/90

10% OFF o

Excluding Sole Items

Expires 11/23/90

99' lb.

49' ..

P

0

N

10 4 oz.

Exp. 11/23/90

Exp. 11/23/90

Exp. 11/23/90

C

ON ANY PURCHASE

GS/qP11..WO

D1PY

Expires 11/23/90
ALL FRUIT
BASE

BUY 2 GET I FREE!

• Non Dairy • No Cholesterol
• No Fat • Low Sodium • 9 Calories per ounce

FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON,
THE GOOD TASTE OF
KAR'S NUTS

Our '1990 Holiday Gift Catalog is full of the
tastiest gift ideas for your business
associates, family and friends.
Shop early and avoid the crowds.
Send us your gift list ... we'll personalize
it with your name and then ship it directly
to your recipient.

To get your catalog or to order the Chanukah Tin Call:

(313) 541-7870

JUST ONE OF THE NUTTY TREATS YOU'LL FIND INSIDE:
CHANUKAH CANNISTER. Whether it's received on the
first night or the last, our Chanukah Cannister offers your
best wishes for a happy holiday. Colorful cannister packs
a hearty 51/4 lbs, of our Cashew, Almond and Raisin Mix.

#484 51/t lb. Chanukah Tin $22.00

Also Available: Fancy Mixed Nut Tin • Cashew Tin
Gift Baskets • Serving Trays

Moste,Cord

116 NUTS (

1525 Wanda, Ferndale

'/4 mile west of I.75 at 9 Mile Road)

Retail outlet store open 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.; 8 a.m.-12 p.m. Sat. (Dec. Only)

Tables • Desks
Wall Units
Bedrooms
Dining Rooms

For

A ppt

Call

90

12 Years' Experience & Expertise in the Design
of Affordable Laminate, Lucite & Wood
Furniture

M uriel Wetsman

AMMO

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1990

I

661-3838

Savor Tradition
For Thanksgiving

RUTH SAMUELS

Special to The Jewish News

L

et's

hope Wolfgang
Puck doesn't get hold
of Thanksgiving din-
ner. Two-tone, mesquite
flavored turkey mousse with
parsley puree would certain-
ly cause an Indian uprising at
our log cabin.
In a large family, where
everyone takes their turn
cooking holiday dinners,
Thanksgiving is always my
favorite. Traditional, not nov-
elty, recipes are stressed. Our
table is a revisit to the past
where imagination was dem-
onstrated daily.
Food was woven more inti-
mately into the fabric of dai-
ly life in pioneer times than
today. Colonial Americans
left diaries and journals tell-
ing tragic stories about the
deaths of nine out of every 10
early settlers. "Starving
time" it was called. Most co-
lonials from England and
Holland were city-bred and
unfamiliar with country life.
The American Indian became
both teacher and savior, in-
structing the settlers in hunt-
ing, food preparation and
preservation. What good were
cookbooks from home to
housewives confronted with
the strange contorted shapes
of squash, pumpkin and corn?
Indian tribes moved from lo-
cation to location, which gave
variety to their diet. Wild and
cultivated botanicals were us-
ed for food, medicines,
cosmetics and smoking
mixtures.
Nut butters and seed but-
ters became an excellent and
nutritious topping for breads,
cakes, fruit and vegetables.
Peanut butter, an institution
in America, evolved from this
culture. Leaf flavorings such
as Coltsfoot seasoned many
dishes and were highly priz-
ed by numerous Indian tribes.
This leaf was rolled in a ball
and dried thoroughly by the
fire; the resulting ash was a
salt substitute.
Cornmeal, corn soup, corn
pudding and even popcorn
were eaten. Every part of the
corn was utilized — even the
cobs were dried and used for
fire starters. Pumpkin pie
probably started out as a nut-
and-pumpkin soup that was
left too long in the kettle.
Potatoes, both white and
sweet, were stored in "aborig-
inal barnes" (underground
storage pits lined and covered

Ruth Samuels is a food
writer in Pennsylvania.

with tree bark). And what
could taste better than pota-
toes thrown directly on the
firewood, retrieved by a stick
and consumed without satur-
ated fat?
Along with turkey at that
"First Thanksgiving," ani-
mals like rabbit, raccoon and
venison were stewed, roasted
and stuffed. Nuts, mush-
rooms, fresh cranberries, wild
grapes and dried black wal-
nuts were all found at this
momentous occasion.
After dinner, the American
Indians introduced the early
settlers to smoking which
they used both medicinally
and ceremonially. Pipes were
most often used although the
corn husks made a dandy cig-
arette. Most Indians smoked
a variety of dried wild herbs,
blended with a small amount
of tobacco.
According to early accounts,
Indians were free of skin
disease and would wash
themselves with oils of fishes
mixed with herbs.
JERUSALEM
ARTICHOKE SALAD
Marinade:
1 pound Jerusalem
artichokes, scrubbed
and diced
2 whole scallions,
chopped finely
1 /2 cup nut oil (peanut,
walnut, etc.)
1 /2 cup cider vinegar
1 tablespoon honey
1 tablespoon chopped
fresh mint leaves
2 cups of mixed greens
(endive, red leaf,
romaine)
Place diced artichokes and
chopped scallion in large
bowl.
Add oil, vinegar, honey and
mint leaves. Toss well and
marinade for 1 hour at room
temperature.
Prepare salad greens and
refrigerate.
Toss salad greens with mar-
inade and serve. Serves 6.

FRUIT AND NUT
STUFFING
(for 10 pound turkey)
1 large onion, chopped
1 small stalk celery,
sliced
3 McIntosh apples, cored
and chopped
3 tablespoons margarine
1 /4 cup applesauce
2 cups fresh white bread
cubes
1 /4 cup chopped black
walnuts
1 /4 cup dried fruit (tart
cherries, raisins)
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 /4 teaspoon pepper

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