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November 09, 1990 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I OPINION

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER THE UNBEATABLE DEALER THE UNBEATABLE

BEAT 'THE GAS CRUNCH
JOE PANIAN HAS CARS
W/THE HIGHEST MILES
PER GALLON AVERAGE

3 Years Standing

T
H
E

N

E

A

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER

B

E

WAS

$12,121

D
E
A

NEW 1990 3 14 TON
SUBURBAN

L

Loaded!
All the Toys

Center & rear seats, 2-tone paint, air, cruise, titt,
stereo, bucket seats, deep tinted glass, rear
heater, HD cooling, HD suspension, 350 cubic
inch V-8. Stk. #3239.

WAS

WAS

E
R

$23,964*
BUY NOW
$17 727*

$18 845
BU Y NOW
$14 833*

Ge.o

NEW 1990
GEO
PRIZM
4 DOOR SEDAN. P175/70/R13, ALS S/B radials, front &

rear mats, 1.5L MFL Lr engine, 5 speed manual trans.,
cloth buckets, power steering, am/fm stereo w/seek &
scan, digital dock, fuN whl. covers, sport mirrors. Stk. #
4959.

THIS WEEK ONLY

NEW 1991
GEO METRO

2 DOOR HEI. P145/80R12 ALS S/B radial tires,
sport mirrors, 1.0L TBI L3 engine, 5 speed man-
ual transmission, stereo, defogger.
Order #162P96.

$7995*
1st Time Buyer
$7395*

THIS WEEK ONLY

NEW 1990 GEO
STORM 2 + 2

NEW 1991 GEO
TRACKER
CONVERTIBLE

ti



$5995*
$5395*

1st Time Buyer

SPORT COUPE. 1.6L SOHC L4 MPFI engine,
P185/60/R steel belt tires & more. Stk. #5268X.

WAS
LEADING EDGE

M)

A
T
A
B
L

$9927*
BUY NOW
$7743*

$9995*

H

B

WAS

1;Tiine43gyer

454 SS
HALF TON
PICK-UP

E U C

2.8 V6, 5 spd., manual trans_ w/00, 2-tone
paint, Tahoe trim, power steering/brakes, am/fm
stereo/cass. w/clock, sliding back window,
chrome step bumper. Stk. #7422X.

THIS WEEK ONLY

GUY STERN

THE UNBEATABLE,

NEW CARS & TRUCKS
NEW 1991
NEW 1991
S-10-PICK UP
CORSICA LT

4 DOOR SEDAN, Cloth buckets, rear window
def., ak 2.21 EFI L4 eng., auto., P185/75R S/B
racial tires, tint glass, inter. wipers, floor mats,
map lamps, w/roof console. Stk. #7336.

Germans Also Worry
About Re-Unification

T

A

up to 58 Miles to the Gallon

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER

$10,705
$500

THIS WEEK ONLY

Rear folding seat, 1.6L EFI 5 speed manual
transmission, cloth interior, power steering, am/
fm stereo w/clock, air conditioning. Stk. #7349.

WAS

$7995*
1st Time Buyer
$7395*

$11,024*
BUY NOW
$9792*

'Just add tax. title, destination and documentation fees. All rebates and dealer incentives included where applicable. Dealer participation
may affect consumer cost. First Time Buyer deducted from price where applicable to qualified buyers. 7.9% for up to 48 months in feu
of a rebate on select models. Based on approved credit. Prices expire Nov. 15, 1990.

G

ees Dealer

CUL VROLET

MEDIUM DUTY
TRUCK CENTER

28111 TELEGRAPH
AT 12 MILE & 1696
SOUTHFIELD

355-1000

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER THE UNBEATABLE DEALER

10 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1990

I

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER

D
E
A
L

R

amburg — The City of
Hamburg has a par-
ticularly rich Jewish
heritage. During my visit I,
together with other invited
American scholars, was
shown the birthplace of
Albert Ballin, the Hamburg
ship-builder and adviser to
William II, and the homes of
the bankers, financiers and
philanthropists Max Warburg
and Karl Melchior — all three
founders of numerous
cultural institutions in
Hamburg.
In this Hanseatic harbor ci-
ty where people have found
an easy compromise between
a veneration for tradition and
for political liberalism, the re-
cent surge of European anti-
Semitism has been less
manifest and certainly not as
overt. And the students and
faculty at the University of
Hamburg, where I par-
ticipated in a conference on
authors and artists exiled
from Nazi Germany, are not
hesitant in recalling Nazi ter-
rorism, perhaps because their
memory is consistently jogg-
ed by the name of their main
library. It was named after
Carl von Ossietzky, winner of
a Nobel Peace Prize, and an
early victim of the lethal
bludgeons of the Gestapo.
On a more individual basis
a student of library science
startled me by knowing in
great detail the history of the
Jews in her hometown,
Lemgo, and the name of their
historian, Karla Frankel
Rahveh, now an Israeli.
This spirit of both tradition
and liberalism — for example
Hamburg's past mayor, Klaus
von Dohnany (brother of the
Cleveland conductor), is the
son of a resistance fighter ex-
ecuted by the Nazis — might
presumably have buffered the
shock of the recent and inor-
dinately sudden German
unification. But Hamburg is
as elated and troubled by the
consequences of that historic
event as the rest of Germany,
East and West. The applaud-
ed demise of a dictatorship
and its oppressive rule is
coupled with worries about
the future.
East Germans abounded in
Hamburg during my visit;

Dr. Stern fled Germany prior
to World War II. He is a
distinguished professor of
Romance and Germanic
languages and literature at
Wayne State University and a
board member of the
Holocaust Memorial Center

the border to the former GDR
— the "gradually disappear-
ing republic" as English-
speaking citizens sarcastical-
ly explained the acronym
towards the end — is close by.
Their sense of wonderment at
the abundance and variety of
consumer goods, which I
observed in several small
retail shops and in the huge
department stores, are
sometimes tinged with
frustration and resentment.
Frustration, because their
limited pocket book restrains
them from fulfilling many
deferred demands; resent-
ment, because they now
realize, in retrospect, how ob-
jectly they have played the
role of step-children opposite
their affluent West German
brothers and sisters.
But there is annoyance, if
not resentment, among the
citizens of Hamburg as well.
Given the buying sprees of
East German visitors, shelves
are often empty and items
out-of-stock. "Like locusts," I
heard one Hamburg matron
mutter, unable to get the
right size casserole dish at
Brinkmann's, a large glass,
gift and porcelain store.

Germany is elated
and troubled by
re-unification.

It is precisely the daily
microscopic event — small
triumphs, annoyances and
hidden fears — that affect
Germans of all walks of life,
but which don't surface much
in the media. The media
highlight, quite understan-
dably, such global topics as re-
educating the East Germans
towards democracy, the near-
bankruptcy of East German
industries, the devastated
ecology in the erstwhile GDR,
the housing crisis in all Ger-
man cities and — on the
sports page — the migration
of East German soccer stars
to the West or the predicted
triumphs of a united German
team at the Olympics in
Barcelona and Atlanta.
Of course, each story is in-
terspersed with anxious and
recurring speculations: "Who
will pay for all of this," link-
ed inevitably to the can-
tankerous answer that it will
be, primarily, the West Ger-
man taxpayer. But one Ger-
man shop-keeper, a green-
grocer, admitted to me sotto
vocce what often is ignored in
the newspapers: because of
Continued on Page 12

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