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October 19, 1990 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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1k-flay

V O LVO

I

I
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NEWS

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is Your 2nd Largest Investment
Why Not Make it Your Safest!!

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a

I

Nazi Hunters
Spotlight 49

Sydney, Australia (JTA) —
The Israeli office of the
Simon Wiesenthal Center
has submitted another 49
names of suspected Nazi war
criminals believed living in
Australia to the govern-
ment's Special Investiga-
tions Unit,
But given the govern-
ment's record to date,
chances are slim that any of
the suspected Nazis will be
prosecuted.
Since the Special In-
vestigations Unit was estab-
lished in 1987, it has receiv-
ed the names of nearly 600
suspects from a variety of
sources, including a total of
256 from the Wiesenthal
Center over the last four
years.
Of the 600 suspects named,
576 cases were investigated
and dropped, the Special In-
vestigations Unit's director
told Parliament last month.
"I am satisfied the com-
plainants are malicious, or I
am satisfied that the person
is the wrong person, or I am
satisfied that the person,
although the right person, is
not here," the director ex-
plained.
Leslie Caplan, president of
the Executive Council of
Australian Jewry, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that the Jewish community
was "satisfied the SIU has
investigated the material
received from all sources."
Mr. Caplan added that the
government was correct to
make sure that only cases
where strong evidence exists
come before the courts.
A prerequisite of prosecu-
tion is the availability of
credible witnesses who are
willing to testify in court.
Researchers working for
the Special Investigations
Unit concede that in the
absence of witnesses, some
Nazi killers evade justice. To
date, only one case has come
to court.
It is the case of Ukrainian-
born Ivan Polyukhovich,,
whose trial was to have
opened last August. It was
postponed when the accused
challenged the validity of
legislation that allows
suspects to be tried in
Australia for crimes alleged
to have been committed
elsewhere.
His hearing is scheduled
for Nov. 9 in the Australian
High Court. According to
Justice Mary Gaudron, Mr.
Polyukhovich's challenge
"has some prospect of
success."

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