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October 12, 1990 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HOLIDAYS

ilOM E

FOR

TH E

0141:DAY S

PHIL JACOBS

Assistant Editor

npredictable weather,
wind fronts and even
a suddenly religious
yellow jacket or two couldn't
keep Jews last week from get-
ting out the lumber, the can-
vas, the bamboo and the
greenery in their sukkah-
building efforts.

au

From Oak Park to
Southfield to West Bloom-
field and places beyond,
sukkahs were constructed
reflecting the builder's own
particular style. Some were
elaborate constructions that
could have passed for home
additions.
Drs. Neil and Lynn Blavin
of Southfield had a company
that makes canvas covers for
boats come up with a ver-
satile sukkah, complete with
zippered windows and a door
supported on a conduit
structure.

In West Bloomfield,
Dennis and Ellen Yashin-
sky's family sukkah looked
as if it could hold up against
any sort of weather. Com-
plete with lattice work
windows and solidly built
wooden walls, the sukkah
emptied out into a large
family room area.
"It's something we look
forward to all year," Mrs.
Yashinksy said. "You know
that it's fall when it's time to
build the sukkah."
Over in Oak Park, Rabbi
Alon Tolwin's backyard was
filled with the banging
noises of a hammer or two.
Rabbi Tolwin's sukkah is in
its seventh season.
"It's more than a place to
eat; it's also a meeting place,
and we also plan to sleep in
the sukkah as well. I love
the holiday because it's an
important part of the new
year, the new season for us,
and when it's all over, it's
back to the humdrum real
world."



Far left: Julie
Yashinsky works
on stringing ears
of Indian corn for
her family's
sukkah.

Left: Rabbi Alon
Tolwin and his
son, Chaim, 13,
put together a
wall of their
sukkah behind
their Oak Park
home.

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O
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0

48

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1990

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