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October 05, 1990 - Image 67

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Yeshiva Beth Yehudah

is Proud to Announce

Our 76th Anniversary Dinner

Pa.-based spaghetti sauce
manufacturing plant.
"The most difficult part of
this was finding a company
to reproduce my recipe in a
2,000-quart vat," Mr. Layne
says. "I began to search the
country for a company that
could duplicate my recipe
and produce a competitively
priced sauce with the same
recipe.
The result? "It's pretty
close," he says.
The taste of the sauce,
which comes in original
(meatless), mushroom and
meat flavors, is distinctive
from the pizza flavor. It is
zesty with crushed tomatoes
and a touch of cheese.

Undisputed industry leaders
are Prego and Ragu, which
make up 50 percent of the
market, analysts say.
In addition to Prestige's
advertising, each jar pro-
vides a coupon for a free piz-
za topping from Domino's.
Domino's started
marketing its label by licen-
sing other products, like
bubble gum and Nintendo
video games, four years ago.
Company officials say such
marketing concepts give
more logo recognition, con-
sequently boosting pizza
sales.
The limited partnership
with Prestige Foods marks a
first for Domino's, which has

When he's not
contracting real
estate deals, chef
Sandy Layne is
stirring up
ingredients.

"We are getting the con-
sumer another high quality
product and it is more ex-
posure for Domino's and pro-
tects our trademark," says
Norm Nickin, Domino's vice
president for corporate
licensing. "Some people
want a different sauce than
what is on the shelves and
Mr. Layne had a high quali-
ty, great tasting sauce.
"We've had several other
companies come to us with
spaghetti sauces," Mr.
Nickin says. "This was the
only unique one. It has a
real strong marinara taste
but no aftertaste. The taste
is unparalleled; it is
phenomenal?'
Industry experts say the
majority of new products in-
troduced to the food market
each year fail. Yet such odds
do not concern Mr. Layne,
who hopes his company will
generate between $10 and
$17 million in gross sales by
the end of 1991.
"We have confronted the
negative aspects of the
market," he says. "We are
not looking at flopping."
Mr. Layne is counting on
Domino's name recognition
to help the sauce compete in
a market already saturated
with other products, even
those family recipes already
being sold under the names
of such celebrities as Paul
Newman and Frank Sinatra.

never before licensed a food
product sporting its name.
Nationwide sales are not
planned until next year. Mr.
Layne says he will start with
600,000 jars of sauce on
grocery shelves in Michigan,
Ohio, Illinois and Indiana
this month.
Mr. Layne's goal this year
is to attract 1 percent of the
total market, in which con-
sumers spent an estimated
$1.6 billion on spaghetti
sauces in 1989, according to
a study by the trade publica-
tion Supermarket Business.
By the end of 1993, Prestige
hopes to aquire more than 5
percent of the national
market with $43 million is
sales.
Of the 2,000 new food con-
diment products introduced
each year, few make it to the
store shelf, says Mike Duff,
senior editor of Supermarket
News. Since Mr. Layne's
product is on store shelves, it
has an edge over other pro-
ducts, he says.
"If it is in the store, it is a
good step. That is a foot in
the door," Mr. Duff says.
"The question is: Do people
really want to eat Domino's
spaghetti sauce? People are
loyal to certain spaghetti
brands. He is rowing against
a strong current. I don't
know if Domino's is more at-
tractive than Prego or
Ragu." 0

Guest Speaker

Mario M. Cuomo

Governor of the State of New York

The 76th Annual "Yeshiva Dinner"
Golden Torah Awardee Mr. Norman Allan • November 1 1
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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

67

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