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October 05, 1990 - Image 61

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

• A member of several
Canadian halls of fame,
Goldman in 1973 was named
the top student-athlete of the
half-century (1922-72) at
W.D. Lowe (formerly Wind-
sor-Walkerville) Secondary
School.
• The Detroit Catholic
Schools Association named
him "Official of the Year" in
1969, capping his 43-year
career officiating football
and basketball.
• He's a member of Men-
sa, the organization for peo-
ple whose scores fall in the
upper two percent (98th
percentile and above) on
standard I.Q. tests.
• He's still going strong at
age 80, teaching daily at
Oakland Community Col-
lege and playing raquetball,
handball and golf several
times a week.
Bud Shaver wrote in the
Detroit Times a number of
years ago: "Julius Goldman
would have made the first
team of any Big 10 school in
both football and basket-
ball."
"He was the best there
was" on the basketball
court, says fellow Windsorite
Glanz, eight years Goldie's
junior. "I've followed
basketball all of my life. I've
seen Honey Berris play, the
Fishman brothers, Cincy
Sachs and his players, and
Goldie was easily on their
level.

"He always has had a
great basketball mind.
Nobody in this area could
put him down in basket-
ball."
Or in anything else, it
seems.
There was the time Goldie
and his Windsor Ford
teammates were playing
Toronto for the Ontario
basketball championship, a
step on the road to qualify-
ing for the 1936 Olympics.
One of Toronto's big fellows,
who had been smashing
Goldie under the boards all
day, fouled out — only to be
replaced by another, equally
vicious player three or four
inches taller than Goldie.
"You think that guy was
tough, just you wait,"
sneered the newcomer after
smashing down on Goldie's
shoulder while ostensibly
battling for a rebound.
"That so?" responded
Goldie, whose team was
safely in the lead. "Well, try
this on for size." And he
nailed the bigger guy with
an uppercut to the chin,
which got both players
ejected.
And there was the time in
the Windsor City baseball
league that a certain catcher

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Goldie coached in the '36 Berlin Olympics.

was sprinkling Goldie's
shoes with sand as the pitch
was coming in. The umpire
said he hadn't seen
anything. So Goldie leaned
down, got a handful of sand
in his right hand and let it
fly into the catcher's face on
the backswing as the next
pitch came in. "The catcher
yelled his head off, but the
umpire didn't see that,
either," wrote Detroit
columnist Mark Beltaire.
Years later, as an official,
Goldie encountered a Ham-
tramck coach who wouldn't
stay on the bench when the
ball was in play. "You can't
tell me what to do,"
snickered the coach.
"No, I can't tell you what
to do," acknowledged Goldie.
"But I can tell you what will
happen. If you want to act
like a spectator, I'm going to
put you up in the stands."
Thereafter, the coach behav-
ed himself.
"I don't like anybody to in-
timidate me," says Goldie
matter-of-factly, recalling
how he handled a dispute
with another teacher over
school-room assignments
which Goldie had been au-
thorized to make.
The teacher, who had con-
siderably more seniority,
ended one session by walk-
ing out of the room, slamm-
ing the door behind him. The
next time they met, Goldie
propped his chair against
the door, sat in it and said
quietly, "I think we should
get this straightened out
now." They did.
Of the fisticuffs and other
altercations, Goldie would
say, many years later,
"You're not fighting because
you're mad. You just have to
take a stand."
A son of immigrant
parents — his older brother
Leo was known as "Big
Goldie" — Julius Goldman

was born in South Carolina.
He retained his United
States citizenship and thus
was ineligible to play for
Canada in the Olympics.
But, as the assistant Cana-
dian coach, he put his wit to
work and the Canadians,
though trailing badly (15-4)
at the half in the gold medal
game, shut down the bigger,
stronger U.S. team with a
highly effective second-half
stall. But the U.S. team won
the gold, 19-8.
"Goldie was one of the first
basketball players to be am-
bidextrous," recalls Al
Glanz, who was recruited by
Goldie for Detroit Tech. "In
fact, when he was coaching
at DIT, if you couldn't shoot
with both hands, you
couldn't play on his team."
•Goldie says personal expe-
rience provided the impetus
for his getting the jump-ball
rule changed by the Olympic
rules committee, upon which
Goldie represented Canada.
In one game, he played
against a taller center who
outjumped Goldie three out of
every four jump-balls,
"except when I stepped on
his foot," Goldie recalls.
The only one who objected
to the rules change, he says,
was Dr. James Naismith,
creator of the game of
basketball, who attended the
meeting.
The importance of that
change was underscored in a
1988 statement by Ed Steitz,
who was discussing the
merits of the three-point rule
as chairman of the National
Collegiate Athletic Associ-
ation basketball rules com-
mittee.
"It's the most radical
change in the entire evolu-
tion of the game," said Steitz
of the three-point rule. "The
second was the elimination
of the jump ball after every
score." ❑

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

61

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