100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 31, 1990 - Image 66

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-08-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS I

30th Anniversary Sale

Help Us Celebrate!

0ff
%

5

O

.

Manuf. List Price

All Decorative Lighting Fixtures,
Table and Floor Lamps

• Traditional
• Colonial
• Contemporary

10% Off All Ceiling
*******************1
* * .. Free Drawing for
44
Lamps!
* Ceiling Fan & T
********************
Sale extends thru Sept. 2, 1990
Fans

Brose Lighting Supply, Inc.

541-1765 • SUMMER HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9-5:30. Thur. 9-8. Sat. 9-3
1965 Woodward Avenue, Berkley (3 blks North of 11 Mile)

"While Supplies Last •

I

VISC

Greg

ORCHARD MALL
851.5566

ORCHARD LIC RD N. OF MAPLE
WEST BLOOMFIELD

SHOES

MarNreard

EVERGREEN PLAZA
559-3580

12 MILE & EVERGREEN
SOUTHFIELD

DANCE STUDIO

Enroll Now .. .

Tap • Jazz • Ballet • Modern • Boys' Classes • Baby Rhythm

in Tiffany Plaza

Northwestern & 14 Mile

Call

737-2611

SUMP PUMP failure
OR POWER OUTAGE IS NO PROBLEM IF YOU

HAVE AN AUTOMATIC JET PUMP.

INSTALLATION AVAILABLE

H. B. LEWIS PLUMBING

66

FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 1990

Kharkov Returns Shul
After Nearly 70 Years

$149.50

352-9350

CLASSIFIEDS
GET RESULTS!

Call The Jewish News

354-6060

New York (JTA) — The
municipality of Kharkov, a
city in the Soviet Ukraine,
returned a synagogue to the
Jewish community there
last week with fanfare and
good wishes.
Present at the Aug. 21
ceremony were Soviet offi-
cials, at least one Israeli and
two American Jews: Sidney
Kwestel, president of the
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America,
and New York City Coun-
cilman Noach Dear.
The ceremony, televised in
the Soviet Union and an-
nounced in local news-
papers, included fluttering
Israeli flags.
"Glasnost has given us the
ability and the opportunity
to help our Jewish brethren
in the Soviet Union," said
Mr. Dear, who was involved
in efforts to get the syn-
agogue back.
Ivan Kaglov, vice presi-
dent of the Ukraine, prom-
ised the assemblage that the
republic was changing. "One
vital part of that change is to
forever bury the horrid past
that has characterized
Ukrainian-Jewish relations
over the past centuries," he
said.
Kharkov, a center of the
Zionist movement before the
Holocaust, has been the
scene of numerous official
anti-Jewish activities over
the years, including numer-
ous arrest of worshipers, the
closure of a matzah-baking
factory by police in 1960 and
the plowing over of a Jewish
cemetery in 1967 to make a
public park.

Charles Levine, an Israeli
public relations agent who
attended the ceremony, said,
"A very different mood is
prevalent, at least for now,
as a changing Ukraine seeks
overseas Jewish support for
its rapidly evolving poli-
cies."
The Orthodox Union in-
tends to bring the Kharkov
shul under its wings, said
Mr. Kwestel.
Mr. Kwestel, whose organ-
ization represents Orthodox
synagogues in the United
States and around the world,
and Mr. Dear, who repre-
sents a committee to
preserve Jewish places of
worship in the Soviet Union,
are the latest of several
American Jewish activists to
take interest in helping the
Kharkov Jewish commun-
ity, numbering some 70,000,
retrieve the shul, taken from

the Jewish community in
the 1920s.
The quest to take back the
shul has been a special pro-
ject of the Jewish Federation
of Cincinnati, which sent a
delegation to Kharkov in
May.
The Cincinnati federation
adopted Kharkov as a twin
city and offered to help the
city's Jews, several of whom
asked American Jews for
help in renovating the syn-
agogue, which had been used
as a health club and a sports
center.
Rabbi Zev Scharfstein, a
member of the Chabad
movement who is a leader of
the Cincinnati Vaad Hoier,
or community religious
council, said the Kharkov
municipality had offered to
return the synagogue to the
Jewish community if a
replacement for its sports
center would be provided.
Rabbi Scharfstein said the
Cincinnati federation was
trying to raise funds to buy a
prefabricated building,
manufactured in Sweden, to
replace the sports club.

1DF Soldiers
Are Charged

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Thirty-
one members of the Israel
Defense Force were found
guilty of desertion by a
court-martial this week, but
there were apparently
mitigating circumstances.
Punishments varied from
prison to probation.
The soldiers, nearing the
end of their three-and-a-half
years of compulsory military
service in the army, navy or
air force, were sent to a
training base to prepare for
future reserve duty in the
artillery.
They charged that
although IDF veterans, they
were treated like raw
recruits at the training base
and insulted by their in-
structors. They also com-
plained that the food at the
base was unpalatable.
When the base commander
refused their request for an
interview, they walked off
the base but were soon ar-
rested by the military police
and held as deserters.
Three were sentenced to 21
days in military prison.
Three others were confined
to barracks for three weeks.
The rest were released on
promise of good behavior.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan