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August 31, 1990 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-08-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IF YOU CAN'T COME TO US
FOR A HOME LOAN,
WE WILL COME TO YOU.

If you're like most people these days,
you're probably stretched pretty thin
at work.

Add to that the time-consuming
activity of looking for a house, and the
demands of your family, and you might feel
too pressed to come in and see us.

If so, please don't worry about it. All

you or your realtor need do is call
1st Nationwide Bank, and together we can
arrange a convenient
place and time for us
iST NATIONWIDE
to come and meet
BANK 71;010NWITTE NETWORK
with you.

.

A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK

WE'LL TREAT YOU WITH RESPECT, CONCERN AND UNDERSTANDING. BUT DON'T WORRY, YOU'LL GET USED TO IV'

6525 TELEGRAPH • (at Maple)
Birmingham • 642-0287

A Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Ford Motor Company.

30

FRIDAY, AUGUST 31 1 1990

r■ ".:=116.
-- ■ 70.
7

LaNDER

©1988, First Nationwide Financial Corp.

Maccabi Games

Detroit 1990

Beth Robinson

Continued from Page 22

her quiet Maccabi Games of-
fice (the Maccabi Office will
remain open until Sept.
15)."Right now, I could get
onto a plane and just go. But
if there would be anything
that would hold me back, it
would be an emotional
thing. Do I want to leave
Detroit?"
Ms. Robinson compared
the job of running the Games
to a marathon. She said she
knew what it was like to get
so tired, but still work on
getting the job done,
"running the extra miles."
She joked about how she
planned to sleep late the
Monday after the Games,
but was pulled out of bed by
her mother, because she had
to move her car.
"The key to running the
Games is to keep things
small and tight in order for
them to work," she said.
"We made it work, ,because
we covered each base and we
were geographically
organized."
The Games coordinator
also said the reason Detroit
was able to enlist 1,000 host
families was because it had a
base of 400 host families it
used in 1984.
Ms. Robinson said she was
not let down by the Games
coming to an end. "I thought
I'd find everything so sad,"
she said, "but it was just the
opposite. I'm still so high
from the entire experience."
And it is exactly that expe-
rience that she will draw
from if she should move to
Baltimore for the next two
years.
"I don't know what I would
do differently, because I still
need to see the Games site in
Baltimore," she said. "But
what I do know is that I love
being a coordinator. There's
no down side to it. Nobody is
going to tell you that you are
crazy for doing something
like this."
Ms. Robinson worked as an
environmental lobbyist, as a
volunteer for the Dukakis
for President campaign and
as an editor and proofreader
before coming to the Jewish
Community Center for the
Games.
The only aspect of the en-
tire Games she would like to
change should she move to
Baltimore comes as more
of a personal request.
"Just a little more sleep,"
she said. "That's all I'd
change."

Rewards, Work
At Swim Meet

For Merrill Saidman, run-
ning the Youth Games
swimming competition had
its rewards and its

challenges.
Arguably the most
difficult sport to coordinate,
Ms. Saidman had to oversee
2,000 entries by 220
swimmers for eight sessions
at the West Bloomfield High
School indoor pool.
Remember the night of the
opening ceremonies at the
Palace of Auburn Hills?
Most of those who left the
ceremonies at about 9:30
p.m. headed home to get
ready for the next day. Ms.
Saidman, however, was
running a coaches' meeting
that didn't end until 1:30
a.m. Warm-ups started at
8:30 a.m.
After having difficulties,
largely in the area of com-
puterization of events at the
opening session Monday
morning, the meet evened
out by the middle of the
afternoon.
"We ran a four-day swim
meet, and I'd say that all of
our kids and parents walked
out of there happy," Ms.
Saidman said. "We had eas-
ily the most amount of par-
ticipants in the smallest
amount of space. And it took
a great deal of intensity and
dedication to make it all
happen. And it was the kids,
the coaches and the vol-
unteers that made it happen
for us.
"The Jewish swimming
population of Detroit are not
professional swimming
parents," she continued.
"This meet was a labor of
love for them all."

.

Reaching World
Via Radio

The labor of love brought
to the Games by Mark Shaw
and Marty Lieberman was
literally heard all over the
world. Mr. Shaw and Mr.
Lieberman ran the Jewish
Community Center Radio
Club's Special Event Ama-
teur Radio Station, K8PBQ,
from the athletes' lounge.
The two spent a great deal
of their time contacting
other stations across the
United States and even as
far away as Australia, tell-
ing other radio operators
about the Games here in
Detroit.
"In one case, we were able
to send a message and the
results of an athlete from
Australia to an operator in
Melbourne," Mr. Shaw said.
Seated near the broad-
casters at one point were
athletes from Litlumnia and
Israel, speaking Hebrew to
one another over a game of
chess. Across the room,
Spanish and the "Queen's
English" were being spoken
over a candy bar and a pop.

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