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August 10, 1990 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOCAL NEWS

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Honigman, Alexander
Win Primaries

KIMBERLY LIFTON and
PHIL JACOBS

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12

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1990

F

ith family and
friends at her side,
Debbie Schlussel
spent a quiet election eve-
ning in her West Bloomfield
apartment, anxiously
awaiting the results of the
24th district state repre-
sentative Republican
primary
On Wednesday, the 21-
year-old Ms. Schlussel, who
fervently campaigned door-
to-door, in movie theaters,
on the radio and television,
didn't know whether she
won or lost. Almost too close
to call, the race put Ms.
Schlussel and Barbara
Dobbs one vote apart — with
Ms. Dobbs surfacing as the
apparent victor.
A recount is expected, yet
results could take weeks.
Meanwhile, Ms. Schlussel,
who would be the youngest
state legislator in the coun-
try if she emerges victorious
and goes on to defeat Hillel
Day School teacher Marcia
Fligman in November, is not
giving up hope.
"I'm exhausted emotional-
ly and physically. I have no
voice," Ms. Schlussel said. "I
think I might win."
Across town, primary
night was fairly quiet - with
some exceptions. iftmdreds
of partygoers were dancing
into the wee hours of the
morning to big band tunes
by a four-man orchestra at a
victory party for Rep. Bill
Schuette, who easily
defeated Grosse Pointe busi-
nessman Clark Durant in a
quest to be the Republican
nominee to face Michigan
Sen. Carl Levin in
November.
With a platform for a
horde of press, cameras and
television crews and a huge
American flag in the
background, Schuette sup-
porters roared as the band
played patriotic songs,
among them, "You're A
Grand Old Flag."
"Carl Levin, you are on
your own. Here we come,"
Mr. Schuette told the crowd
after proclaiming victory
shortly before midnight.
In the Senate, politicos are
keeping a sharp eye on
Michigan, where Mr. Levin
leads the list of vulnerable
incumbents, according to the
assessment of GOP strate-
gists.
Although Mr. Schuette has

a good pro-Israel record, pro-
Israel groups are turning out
in force to support Mr.
Levin, a staunch supporter
of Israel.
Although Mr. Levin faced
no opposition in the primary,
a camp of 250 supporters ate,
drank and watched election
returns throughout the eve-
ning at campaign head-
quarters in Ferndale.
On the local scene, Rep.
David Honigman easily
secured the Republican nom-
ination against Rep. Judith
Miller and businessman
Hugh Brotherton for the
17th district state senate
seat. Now he faces Dem-
ocratic nominee William
Foley in a district with
heavy Republican leanings.
For Mr. Honigman, it was
just a matter of time. The
three-term state represent-
ative said with a quiet sort of
smile that he was
"exhausted, tired and ner-
vous" early Tuesday eve-
ning. But as the tallies came
in to his fashionable West
Bloomfield home, that smile
showed more and more con-
fidence.
Mr. Honigman said that by
far this was his most inten-
sive campaign, that even
with the experience of prior
campaign work, he was
tested by the pace of a
larger, broader election.
He also said that a lighter
election turnout would do
him more harm than good,
and that again was a
variable that concerned him.
But still it was difficult to
believe from the crowded
Honigman home that this
candidate had any shortages
of support. Neighbors on his
usually quiet street were
hard pressed to find parking.
And at 10:45 that night,
Honigman hugged his wife,
emerged from his study with
his arms raised and said to
the waiting crowd, "Ladies
and gentlemen, I have an an-
nouncement to make. We've
won."
With that announcement,
the candidate and his wife
were surrounded by friends
and relatives offering con-
gratulations.
"I feel gratified," he said.
"A lot of hard work went
into our campaign, and its
paid off for us."
The candidate's house was
filled with a diverse group of
people — Jews, Christians,
blacks, whites, the elderly
and the young. There was
even a small contingent of
Continued on Page 14

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