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August 03, 1990 - Image 80

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N EWS

DELI I SALE!
I

NEW!

OPEN
24
HOURS

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Crosswinds Mall
626-0022

ACME KOSHER

From Mon. 7 a.m.
to Sot at t2 Mid
Sunday 7 a.m.-9 pm.

SMOKED SABLE

$6.99

Prices
PLEASE STOP AND Good
Only
SAMPLE
ANY OF orc Anc?rnk.
4-1
' °
Rd.
OUR DELI PRODUCTS Store

'1st

1

I NEW!

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BAGEL
DOG
3 VARIETIES

5 oz.pkg.

lb.

I

99

I NEW!

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I

ACME KOSHER

HERRING

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IN CREAM SAUCE

.99

I

BERNIE'S EAST KOSHER

BAA KC E5E simE N R or
SMOKED WHITEFISH SALAD

$4 . 99

is

IN CREAM OR WINE SAUCE

129

8 oz. jar

.

SMOKED FISH
CORP.

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

ADVERTISED ITEM POUC WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES.
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS

WE STILL HONOR DOUBLE COUPONS UP TO 50'
Prices & Itmes In This Ad Effective Fri., Aug. 3 Thru August 9, 1990

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Health Foods

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the GOOD FOOD CO.
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Kosher Products
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AUDRIANNA'S SHOE GALLERY

I

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80 FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1990

Natural Foods Market
in the Midwest

We Have Everyday
LOW PRICES
on All Major Brands
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OPEN: Mon-Sat 9-9 • Sun 10-6
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We are winning.

4, AMERICAN

CANCER
SOCETC

Religious Offshoot,
Bridge Or Splinter?

BEN GALLOB

Special to The Jewish News

T

he seven-year-old

Union for Traditional
Judaism does not con-
sider itself an emerging fifth
branch of Judaism in North
America, of which there are
already four — Orthodox,
Conservative, Reform and
Reconstructionist.
Although it has just ac-
cepted its first five congrega-
tional affiliates and plans to
open a rabbinical seminary
in the fall, a key official vig-
orously rejected the idea
that the Union is competing
for status with Conservative
Judaism, of which it is an of-
fshoot, or with Orthodoxy,
which its strong traditional
bent closely resembles.
For their part, neither
Conservative nor Orthodox
leaders have indicated that
they are particularly con-
cerned over the expansion of
the new religious organiza-
tion.
The Conservative move-
ment is the principal source
of UTJ members and rabbis;
the Orthodox are a much
smaller source.
Rabbi Ronald Price, UTJ's
executive vice president,
said that in addition to the
five congregations already
accepted, 10 others have ap-
proached UTJ for affiliation.
He stressed that none of
the 15 were solicited to join.
Rabbi Binyamin Walfish,
executive vice president of
the Rabbinical Council of
America, the rabbinical
branch of Orthodox
Judaism, seemed surprised
by Rabbi Price's assertion
that about 100 rabbis who
joined the UTJ came from
the Orthodox community.
"First I have heard about
it," he told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
Rabbi Jerome Epstein, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
United Synagogue of
America, the association of
Conservative congregations,
thought the UTJ would have
at most a "minimal" impact
on the physical and financial
health of its Conservative
parent organization.
The UTJ owes its existence
to fears long entertained by
some Conservative rabbis
and lay members that the
movement was becoming in-
creasingly secularized.
That perception was fueled
by, among other things, the
movement's decision to per-
mit members to drive if they
have to attend Sabbath ser-

vices and the bitter 10-year
battle over the ordination of
women, approved in 1983.
Rabbi Price insisted that
while the decision to ordain
women was a catalyst, it was
not the key reason to estab-
lish a separate organization,
originally called the Union
of Traditional Conservative
Judaism.
The term "Conservative"
was dropped from the organ-
ization's name at its annual
conference in May. The
number of Orthodox mem-
bers increased immediately
thereafter.
Rabbi Price reported that
the Union has 5,000 mem-
bers in the United States,
Canada and Israel, in-
cluding 500 from Orthodox
backgrounds. Approximate-
ly 400 to 500 rabbis, about
100 from Orthodox
backgrounds, have joined.
He insisted that none of
them have resigned from the
RCA or from the Rabbinical
Assembly, the association of
Conservative rabbis.
Rabbi Epstein explained
why the Conservative
movement is not overly con-
cerned by UTJ's impact. The
Conservative moment was
always a coalition move-
ment, he said, offering a
broad spectrum in terms of
ideology.
UTJ, by taking away tra-
ditional members, is
diminishing that ideological
spread.
Rabbi Price, a Conser-
vative, ordained in 1977,
who retains his Rabbinical
Assembly membership, said
UTJ's goal was to promote
Jewish observance
throughout the Jewish
community, especially the
Conservative community.
He said conflicts arise in
the synagogue in areas like
changing from a full Torah
reading to a triennial cycle;
"liberalizing" kashrut stan-
dards within the synagogue;
and changing the rules for
the participation of women
in worship services.
UTJ opposes allowing wo-
men to participate as full
members of a minyan and in
Torah readings, although it
sanctions women con-
gregants leading and par-
ticipating in segregated
women's services.
UTJ's first affiliated con-
gregations are in South
Bend, Ind.; Louisville, Ky.;
in a Milwaukee suburb; in
Colorado Springs, Colo.; and
in the Washington Heights
section of Manhattan.

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