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July 27, 1990 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Claymore Shops

Sinai

Continued from Page 1

SUNDAY
SALE

ONE DAY ONLY!

SUNDAY, JULY 29
12-5 pm

Women's
50 to 75% Off

Selected suits, sportswear, dresses,
coats, sweaters and accessories


Men's

20

to 70%

Off

Selected spring and summer clothing,
sportswear and accessories

The Claymore Shops

722 North Woodward, Birmingham, Michigan 48009

642-7755

( DESIGNS IN DECORATOR
LAMINATES

:



For High Quality Formica
Always At A Great Discount

SPECIALIZING

TO

. • . . .

IN:

Wall Units
Bedrooms
Dining Rooms
Credenzas
Tables
Offices
ALSO
SPECIALIZING:
• Woods • Glass
• Stones • Lucite








BRAND NAME BULBS
FOR EVERY TYPE OF
FIXTURE, DELIVERED
TO YOUR HOME
OR BUSINESS.

*Hard to find specialty bulbs
*Energy saving bulbs
*Assistance with effective &
efficient alternative lighting.

IT DOESN'T HAVE TO COST A
FORTUNE ... ONLY LOOK LIKE IT!
CALL LOIS HARON 851-6989

Allied Member ASID

14

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1990

CALL FOR FREE CATALOG

661-4400

FREE DELIVERY-MIN. $50 ORDER
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

sider restructuring the
hospital. No job cuts are ex-
pected, he said.
Steinberg also said Sinai
and the Detroit Medical
Center, whose negotiators
discontinued merger talks
last September, would
reconsider a possible affilia-
tion.
"I am not pleased or disap-
pointed by the decision,"
said Dr. Sheldon Kantor,
Sinai's chief of staff. "It is
business as usual. The pro-
cess of medicine hasn't
changed, nor has the high
quality we deliver.
"We will still look at joint
ventures," Dr. Kantor said.
"Maybe we won't need a full-
scale merger. Maybe we will
keep joint ventures limited
to certain areas."
Sinai began discussing
possible affiliations after
Steinberg took over the helm
two years ago. A partial or
full-scale merger was part of
Steinberg's plan to help in-
crease the patient load at
Sinai, which normally fills
between 350 to 400 of its 620
beds.
Sinai negotiators have
said they will hold firm to
their commitment not to
enter into any agreement
with another institution
without assurance that
Sinai's Jewish identity
would be maintained.
Under a merger, Sinai,
built in 1953 with Jewish
community contributions,
would continue to be a mem-
ber agency of the Jewish
Welfare Federation.
Dr. Joseph Honet, who
chairs Sinai's widely accla-
imed department of
rehabilitative medicine, said
calling off the merger
"provides a tremendous op-
portunity for Sinai."
Dr. Honet said it is time
for the Jewish community to
concentrate on the hospital's
strengths, not on its
weaknesses. He referred to
the newly refurbished, state-
of-the-art rehabilitation
wing at Sinai.
Sinai recently gutted a
ward and invested an
estimated $750,000 to
rebuild the rehabiliation
unit. Built as a 30-bed ward
with limited handicapper
accessibility, the ward now
provides 18 units for han-
dicappers.
Dr. Honet said the
hospital's 15 department
chairs are optimistic that
Sinai's strengths will
enhance its chance of sur-
vival.
"We can survive without a
merger," Dr. Honet said.
"There is nothing wrong
with a merger, but a merger
because of weakness is

wrong. We are strong and
can be an equal partner."
Dr. Melvyn Rubenfire,
Sinai's chief of medicine,
said the merger was not
meant to happen. Over time,
Dr. Rubenfire said, Ford
probably would have
disbanded some of the
hospital's most prized, yet
not financially profitable

Dr. Honet said it's
time for the
community to see
Sinai's strengths.

programs — education and
research.
"There wouldn't have been
any Sinai to be proud of,"
Dr. Rubenfire said. "Now,
with the support of the Jew-
ish community and a sup-
portive board and planning
administration with a vi-
sion, we can build on the
available options.
"In the long term, we will
have to have some integra-
tion with another system be-
cause no hospital can stand
alone," Dr. Rubenfire
said. ❑

Send Us
Your Best Friend

Best Friends. It might
be the guy or girl next
door. . Or a school mate.
Your brother or sister
might be your best friend.
Or even your dog.
The Jewish News wants
to know who your best
friend is for our August 24
Back to School issue. If
you're between 6 and 16,
send us a photograph of
you and your best friend
with your names and your
address on the back. Also
include a paragraph
description of why this
person is your best friend.
The Jewish News will
publish as many entries
as possible and will try to
return all photographs.
Send entries to: The
Jewish News, Carla
Schwartz, 27676 Franklin
Rd. Southfield, MI 48034.

Brandeis Women
Hold Book Sale

The Brandeis University
National Women's Commit-
tee will hold its 29th annual
used book sale during mall
hours Aug. 16-22 at the Tel-
Twelve Mall.
Advance tickets for opening
night, 9:30 p.m.-midnight
may be purchased from
Brandeis volunteers at the
mall Aug. 15. Admission is
free for the entire week of the
sale.

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