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July 20, 1990 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

50*

WHATEVER THE BOOK SAYS YOUR TRADE IS WORTH

EL

ILL PAYIn


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NEW '90 CELICA
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#764

#796



TOYOTA

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615.1".

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333.3300



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Z.401 mr-zos._.

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11 320

11 681

REDUCED
AGAIN!

VIII

:

. •

Buy
Was›,20 NOW $22,585 * *

683,9500

Save $8,700!

"The Superstar
Dealer"

12 units at this price,
9 more at similar
. _ 1_ ,,„
savings.
i

Lease

(36 mos.) $471 85. +Tax

"0" DOWN

"

• plus tax, title and destination all rebates and dealer Incentives
assigned to dealer.
'closed end lease. Cars based on 36 moss. with vehicles same as
plus 1st and sea deposit. Sec deposit on all lease
monthly. "0e
vehicles some as monthly payment refundable at lease end. All
payments plus 4% use tax. To get total payments multiply times
number of months. Penalty for excessive wear. tear and mileage.
Mileage limitation 15.00 per year. 6 1 per mile overage.

MICHAEL ZIPSER

Rare Coin
Investment Specialist

Why You Should Invest in Rare Coins:

In previous issues of The Jewish News I have shown you some examples of
the high quality investment coins I supply my clientele. I thought you would like
to know why serious investors are diversifying their portfolios.

RARE COINS:
• Have increased in value 34 out of the last 35 years
• Grow tax deffered
• Private — no government reporting restrictions
• High returns — coins have averaged over 20% compounded annually

IC

L

62

Richard Charles
Rare Coin Galleries

Michigan's Only Fully-Accredited Coin Dealer

4000 Prudential Town Center
Southfield, Michigan 48075
(313) 356-5252

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

FRIDAY, JULY 20, 1990



#697
'90 CONTINENTAL "EXECUTIVE SERIES"

#720

4178 HIGHLAND RD
(M-59 Near Pontiac Lake Rd.)
WATERFORD

• 5750 more for your hods based on average Black Book value less
mileage, appearance & mechanical reconditioning. Applies to all
new vehicle purchases plus used vehicles $500 & above. One trade
per customer. All prices plus tax. lic, title. dent. Applicable rebates
assigned to dealer. 51000 Cash Rebate on used cars valued at $5000
& above, prices Include rebate. Saie ends 6 p.m. June 27, 1990.

, oa

ow 410

NEW '90 CAMRY

16■.'N....

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1951 S. TELEGRAPH
A I Mi. North of Square Lake
BLOOMFIELD HILLS

LINCOLN
MERCURY

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....

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Corner of 10 Mlle & Greenfield
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irroubled Youth

Continued from preceding page

NEW '90 TAURUS

NEW '90ESCORT

F ORD
96 ( 1 E.,. o 3 f

I ISRAEL

therapeutic framework,"
Ross says.
At the core of Summit's
daily program is teaching
the young people how to live
an independent lifestyle.
"We see ourselves as a
rehabilitory institute," Ross
says. "Our emphasis is not
only on psychology, but on a
more general framework as
well. That means starting
with basic abilities to func-
tion. Most of our patients
have problems getting up in
the morning. If you can't get
up in the morning, no pro-
gram will ever help you."
Rooms are locked by 7:45
a.m. and the patients go to
work — as a volunteer or for
minimal symbolic pay — or
to tutors. Patients prepare
breakfast and supper and
are responsible for main-
taining their dormitory-style
quarters in Jerusalem's
Kiryat Hayovel neighbor-
hood. After mastering
greater independent living
skills, patients can move to a
halfway house or apart-
ments maintained by
Summit.
An additional therapeutic
incentive is what Ross calls
"a token economy."
If patients behave properly
and perform their required
jobs — such as cleaning up
and ordering food — they
earn 23 shekels (about
$11.50) a week for pocket
money, Ross says.
Summit prohibits patients
to receive any additional
money from parents or other
sources — or else the incen-
tive to work and clean would
be lost. Exceptions are made
for special occasions.
During afternoons are
"therapy-related" programs
for individuals and groups of
patients. Counselors also
oversee social activities in-
cluding trips to town for
dinner and movies.
Evenings feature group
discussions, where patients
attempt to help each other
by talking things out among
themselves, aided by
counselors and therapists.
There's also considerable
free time, where patients are
allowed to do whatever they
please off the grounds of the
facility — provided they are
back by curfew of 11:30 p.m.
weekdays and 12:30 a.m. on
weekends.
Like their peers, Summit
patients complain about
"the rules," which include
bans on alcohol, drugs and
sexual relations on the
premises.
Two couples have emerged
from the current group of pa-
tients, which is permitted so
long as behavior is
"appropriate." However,

Summit frowns on such con-
nections, and feelings are
vented openly.
"We believe that nothing
should be kept a secret,"
Ross says. "We're all part-
ners and this is a place to be
together."
A suicide attempt last year
was painfully discussed by
the entire group, which was
able to weather the severe
damage the incident caused.
Some critics say Summit is
simply where rich families
leave the troubled children
they no longer can stand to
have around. Summit staff
members struggle with this
notion as well.
"There's a feeling
sometimes that the kids are
dumped here," Schneider
says. "It also gives a false
feeling of security to the
parents — that they don't

"If you can't get up
in the morning, no
program will ever
help you."
Tzila Ross

have to worry about their
child every day and that
somebody else is going to
take ultimate responsibility.
(But) we try not to look at it
from that vantage point."
Those who have worked
closely with the American
unit as counselors disagree
about the program's
usefulness.
One health professional
claims she "took a total
basket case and put him
back together" and knew of
several cases of young men
and -women who remained in
Israel or returned to the
States after their Summit
treatment. Another spoke of
the verbal physical abuse
she endured. Both might be
considered accurate descrip-
tions of a program where
results are sometimes slow
in coming and the emotional
toll on patients, parents,
therapists and counselors is
heavy.
But the program does seem
to produce results. Despite
complaints, Summit pa-
tients unanimously spoke of
a feeling of "getting better."
Patience — a watchword in
Israel — is vital at Summit.
And the program's staff ap-
pears to be succeeding in ex-
ploiting Israeli reality to
create more independent
young people.
However, measuring those
achievements is not easy.
"If I manage to get every-
one up in the morning, and
the place looks clean, and

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