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July 13, 1990 - Image 112

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

1st Anniversary
Celebration

(tc

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Continued from Page 74

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FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1990

promising at the time. The
Jewish community in Lin-
coln, the state capital,
helped out by taking two
families and four single men
every two months.
Besides the IRO, the
Chicago-based Jewish
Agriculturalists' Aid Society
was also instrumental in
moving Jews to the prairie
states. The society was con-
fident that the peddler or
tailor from the East Coast
cities would have no
difficulty earning a living as
a farmer.
Between 1888 and 1908,
430 farms in the Midwest
were settled by a total of
1,874 Jews. The most pop-
.ular state was North
Dakota, where 40 percent of
the new farmers settled.
The society wanted them
to homestead, thinking that
when the Jews saw the soil
being improved by their own
efforts, they would settle
permanently on the farms.
But such was not the case.
Most who came to try their
hand at farming stayed less
than 10 years. Many left
after two to three years. ❑

Jewish Telegraphic Agency

'90 Soviet Jewish Influx
To Israel Passes 50,000

UP
I R
UP , , - I#

,
. •..•
.....FISH CO

"interesting letters from
immigrants themselves —
from Omaha Jews seeking
help in bringing friends and
family, and from potential
employers."
According to Gendler,
more than 2,000 Jews were
settled in Nebraska through
the IRO. An IRO agent in
Omaha would correspond
with an IRO agent in the
East who was trying to move
Jews out of crowded situa-
tions in which they were
unemployed.
Usually before a family or
wage-earner could be sent to
Nebraska, jobs had to be
found for them by the
Omaha agent. It was impor-
tant that the newly arrived
Jews in Nebraska not
become charity cases. Many
brought to Omaha were
pleased with their new liv-
ing conditions and wanted
relatives and friends to join
them.
According to Gendler,
when the port of Galveston,
Texas, opened in 1907, the
IRO there wanted to send
immigrants to Omaha. But
the job situation was not

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Jerusalem (JTA) — Soviet
Jews continued to arrive in
Israel at a record pace last
month, comprising all but a
small number of olim from
various parts of the world.
Out of 12,600 immigrants
who arrived here in June,
11,015 were Soviet Jews, the
highest monthly total ever.
The numbers were reported
by the Jewish Agency for
Israel and by the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
in Washington.
An additional 182 Jews
left the Soviet Union for the
United States in June, ac-
cording to the New York-
based Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society, which assists
those who have received
permission to come to
America.
So far, 37,563 Soviet Jews
have come to the United
States since the beginning of
the fiscal year last Oct. 1.
The U.S. refugee quota for
the fiscal year is 50,000 from
the Soviet Union, about
40,000 of whom are expected
to be Jews.
The U.S. limits have
resulted in a sharp influx of
Soviet Jews to Israel. In
January, a little more than
4,500 arrived here. In May,
the monthly number had

climbed to 10,202, which
was exceeded by more than
800 in June.
That brings Soviet im-
migration to Israel during
the first six months of 1990
to approximately 50,000, ac-
cording to absorption min-
ister Yitzhak Peretz.
Jewish Agency officials
said that 165,000 were ex-
pected by the end of 1990.
Roughly one million Soviet
Jews, a third of the
estimated Jewish population
of the Soviet Union, now
hold invitations from Israel,
which enables them to apply
for exit visas, Sara Frankel,
a senior official in the
government's Liaison Bu-
reau for Soviet Jewry, told
visiting American Jewish
leaders here last month.
In Washington, the Na-
tional Conference said that
while it is gratified by the
record exodus of Jews from
the Soviet Union, "we are
reminded that cases of long-
term refuseniks remain
outstanding, and that the
USSR continues to impose
superfluous obstacles on
those desiring to emigrate."
Frankel put the number of
refuseniks at 180. She said
most have been waiting for
visas for several years.

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